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  #1  
Old 04-26-2006, 02:57 PM
BigDawg357 BigDawg357 is offline
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What is "dehorning"?




I've seen it mentioned a couple of times around here. Anybody have a before and after picture?
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  #2  
Old 04-26-2006, 03:56 PM
nala1911 nala1911 is offline
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This should help;
http://www.blindhogg.com/gunsmith/dehorning.html
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Old 04-26-2006, 06:08 PM
BigDawg357 BigDawg357 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nala1911
Excellent. That's just what I was looking for. Question though, what's the point? Aesthetics only?
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Old 04-26-2006, 08:20 PM
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Ricky T Ricky T is offline
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Jason:
You can see a fine example of dehorned guns vs. non dehorned guns by visiting a larger gun store that carry factory 1911s (Colts and Springfields)and semi custom 1911s such as Wilsons and Nighthawks. Handle a Colt and a Springfield, you'll find sharp edges all over the gun, sharp enough to draw blood or shave with (almost). GI type grip and thumb safety, slide stop, edges of a slide, edges of the frame all have very sharp edges on factory guns. Handle a Wilson or Nighthawk (I mention these because they're readily available around the Atlanta area), there are no sharp edges to cut your fingers or hand or snag on concealment clothing. Remember the nice Wilson Protector that you HAD? That weapon had been dehorned. Kimbers are lightly dehorned, midway between a Colt and a Wilson is a good comparison.
Aesthetic is only a minor part of dehorning. The biggest benefit is your hands, fingers and clothing will thank you if you shoot more than two magazines in one sitting.
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Old 04-26-2006, 09:23 PM
Lupinus Lupinus is offline
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Dumb newbie question

Are there any parts you want to stay away from dehorning for functional reasons?

When I get mine in a few months sounds like something I'd most defiantly look into but don't wont to go filing at such a beautiful thing in the wrong spots.
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Old 04-26-2006, 10:24 PM
Shootalot Shootalot is offline
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Here is a picture of a Kimber Pro CDP II with what Kimber calls a "carry bevel treatment", others might call it a "melt job".
It is like taking a new bar of soap that has sharp edges and working it until it is mostly smooth.


[IMG][/IMG]
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Old 04-27-2006, 08:04 AM
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Rosco Benson Rosco Benson is offline
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The pistol is a hand tool. If you wander the tool isle of your local hardware store, you will be hard-pressed to find a tool on which the "human interface" has sharp edges. The handles are designed for comfort in use.

Not only does dehorning keep one's hands intact, it prevents undue wear on holsters and covering garments as well. I recall shoving a brand-new Colt Lightweight Officers ACP into a Bruce Nelson Summer Special and having the sharp front edge of the slide slice right through the body of the holster. That will make you say some bad words!

Part of the reason that dehorning hasn't been universally done by the manufacturers of pistols is that most users don't shoot and/or carry them very much. A sharp edge on a pistol laying in the sock drawer doesn't bother anyone. The other reason is the notion that sharp and squared-off edges are an indication of manufacturing quality. Some folks complain that a dehorned pistol looks as if it had a bad polish job at the factory.

The upsurge in people actually using their pistols has accounted for the acceptance of a more "rounded-off" pistol, even among the sock-drawer crowd (look at the Glock). This upsurge has also driven the availability of affordable progressive loaders, inexpensive "white box" ammo, and the explosion of sources for decent holsters (back when I started, it was Sparks or Davis)...but I digress).

As with most things, there are issues of style in dehorning. Some providers are more aggressive in rounding things out. Some use a lighter touch, which provides the functionality of dehorning while maintaining the classic lines of the pistol. Either way, I consider dehorning one of the basic requirements on a pistol.

Rosco

Last edited by Rosco Benson; 04-27-2006 at 08:08 AM.
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Old 04-27-2006, 09:16 AM
BigDawg357 BigDawg357 is offline
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Does the slide or parts in question need to be refinished after dehorning? I have a Gov't all Stainless. Is this something that should really be done by a professional, or if you are really patient would it be a bad idea for one to do it themself?
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Old 04-28-2006, 08:37 AM
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Rosco Benson Rosco Benson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDawg357
Does the slide or parts in question need to be refinished after dehorning? I have a Gov't all Stainless.
Carbon steel pistols would need to be refinished to prevent rust on the bare spots where the exisiting finish was removed. A stainless pistol wouldn't need this, but you might want to have it bead-blasted to make the areas that were worked on blend in with the texture of the rest of the pistol.

As to whether this is a do-it-yourself project, this all depends on how handy on is and one's expectations of the finished product.

Rosco
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Old 04-28-2006, 09:06 AM
BigDawg357 BigDawg357 is offline
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I'm thinking that later on when I get caught up on medical bills and have some spare cash, I may send the slide in to someone reputable, have it dehorned, and then refinished in black to make it look like the Wilson Combat Super Grade. I really like this look. I've already added the Wilson Combat SpeedChute MSH/Magwell to this Kimber TLE/RL II that I have.

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