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  #26  
Old 01-30-2009, 11:41 AM
gamel gamel is offline
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Moving a gun safe




With my C&R collection, it's definately time to get a gun safe. My parents don't mind either, since my dad and brother need a place for their shotguns and such as well. We already have a spot picked out, and so on.Well, how exactly do we go about getting this from Gander Mountain and into our home? I'm thinking we could move it ourselves, it's about 530 pounds, and I'm pretty sure our '99 Ford Explorer could handle that. I suppose there is some worry since it would be all that weight over mostly the rear axle.Is it something we can do ourselves, or should we get someone we know with a trailer or pickup to help us out with moving it? Or would Gander Mountain offer some sort of service?If we can do it on our own, the spot is going ot be in our garage, with it's concrete floor. Just back the car in, and wiggle the safe into the corner, where it will be hidden from view and once we figure out how, bolted to the floor.
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  #27  
Old 01-30-2009, 12:40 PM
farley45 farley45 is offline
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A lot of great advice here. I moved mine myself as well, mostly because my girlfriends father is one of those "if someone else can do it so can we" guys. Cabelas put it in my pickup with a skid loader and we were able to slide it down the end gate with a refrigerator dolly and 4 other guys. From there it was very eays to get into the house and it only took two of us to wiggle it into place. Harderst part was mine was bolted from the inside to pieces of steel that served as a pallet, so getting those off took a little bit of gumption. A tommy lift on a truck would have been nice, but not necessary. Good luck, and remember you just have to be smarter than what your working with.
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  #28  
Old 01-30-2009, 01:03 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gamel View Post
With my C&R collection, it's definately time to get a gun safe. My parents don't mind either, since my dad and brother need a place for their shotguns and such as well. We already have a spot picked out, and so on.Well, how exactly do we go about getting this from Gander Mountain and into our home? I'm thinking we could move it ourselves, it's about 530 pounds, and I'm pretty sure our '99 Ford Explorer could handle that. I suppose there is some worry since it would be all that weight over mostly the rear axle.Is it something we can do ourselves, or should we get someone we know with a trailer or pickup to help us out with moving it? Or would Gander Mountain offer some sort of service?If we can do it on our own, the spot is going ot be in our garage, with it's concrete floor. Just back the car in, and wiggle the safe into the corner, where it will be hidden from view and once we figure out how, bolted to the floor.
Yes, if you have a decent-sized collection you owe it to yourself and everyone else to get a safe to keep them in. However I don't recommend putting it in a garage. Aside from the fact that the garage isn't heated and you'll have issues with moisture, the greater danger lies in the fact that it's relatively easy to steal a safe out of a garage. The scumbags can break into your garage, put a heavy chain around the safe and drag it outside with a truck. If you bolt it to the concrete floor it'll make it more difficult, but with enough leverage the bolts may fail. You'll also be advertising the fact that you have a safe and potential valuables inside whenever you leave the garage door open on the weekend.

Try to find a place inside the house, and buy the safe from somewhere that offers installation. Otherwise look up somebody who does heavy moving. With the right dollies and equipment they can put it just about anywhere.
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  #29  
Old 01-30-2009, 01:05 PM
maximus83 maximus83 is offline
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When I bought my safe, which is 400-some pounds, I bought a couple of those little 4-wheel square carts, they are about a 1 foot square. They can handle huge heavy loads, and they're designed for putting under heavy furniture and stuff to move it.

Since we didn't have to move up any steps, I had the company drop my safe off at the curb, not extra cost. My wife and I were able to rock the safe back enough to get the 2 little 4-wheeled carts under it, and then we just literally rolled it up the driveway, through the garage, and to its position in the basement. Didn't even have to rent a dolly! Obviously, the catch is that this only works if you can get directly from your street to the basement with no steps.
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  #30  
Old 01-30-2009, 02:21 PM
TRSOtto TRSOtto is offline
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Now....having seen all these posts about how easy it is to move a 500# safe........I'm glad mine weighs 1500#'s ....empty. AND bolted to the floor.
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  #31  
Old 01-30-2009, 02:51 PM
Slayer Slayer is offline
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A buddy of mine needed my help putting one in. We had to brace his floor up first cause his was so heavy. Then it took me and another friend to lift it and him to steady it. We used short snatch straps and some rigging to pick it up. Lucky me and the other guy can dead lift over 600lbs each. We would lift it and walk a little ways then stop. His den was to far from his back door so it wasn't so bad.
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  #32  
Old 01-30-2009, 03:16 PM
brickeyee brickeyee is offline
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Rent the appliance truck and ake sure it has tip back wheels.
Strap it on, release the tip[ back wheels, tip it back.
Roll as required.

If you have to go up stairs make sure it has stair climbers in decent shape (look like fan belts on a small track on the bottom back of the truck on each side).

Plywood is good to protect floors since appliance trucks do not usually have pneumatic wheels, just hard rubber.

Plywood is required over carpet.

My safes at work weigh over 1200 pounds each.

We move them as little as possible.
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  #33  
Old 01-30-2009, 04:42 PM
SEMO Shooter SEMO Shooter is offline
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My wife & I used the same type of 4-wheel carts (furniture dollies) to move our safe. We backed the trailer up to the front door, laid the safe down on the dollies and used plywood to make a ramp. We took the safe door off and it went pretty easy. If you have a couple of strong guys to help it would even be easier. We put our safe in the master bedroom closet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by maximus83 View Post
When I bought my safe, which is 400-some pounds, I bought a couple of those little 4-wheel square carts, they are about a 1 foot square. They can handle huge heavy loads, and they're designed for putting under heavy furniture and stuff to move it.

Since we didn't have to move up any steps, I had the company drop my safe off at the curb, not extra cost. My wife and I were able to rock the safe back enough to get the 2 little 4-wheeled carts under it, and then we just literally rolled it up the driveway, through the garage, and to its position in the basement. Didn't even have to rent a dolly! Obviously, the catch is that this only works if you can get directly from your street to the basement with no steps.
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  #34  
Old 01-30-2009, 05:02 PM
ShadyScott999 ShadyScott999 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ockenfuss View Post
I am about to move to Florida and am having mixed thoughts about taking my safe with me. It is a Redhead safe and weighs in the 500 lb range. My question is whether or not it can safely sit on the second floor of a condo. Does anyone know whether or not the standard construction of a two story building can support a 500-600 pound dead load?
If your safe is roughly 30"x24" and weighs 550lbs., that is 110lbs/sq/ft. All modern building codes far exceed that. Think about this, I am 6'3" 250lbs. When standing with my feet together, that is 250 lbs sq/ft. I own a Granite counter top company so I go through this with customers all the time. We may install an island top that weighs 1200 lbs. Depending on the type stone, it only weighs between 22 and 30 lbs sq/ft. And by the way, we move that with only two people and it is fragile. Man up Boys!

My safe weighs around 800lbs and I have moved it several times in the past ten years. Two people and a hand truck is all it takes.

Last edited by ShadyScott999; 01-30-2009 at 05:05 PM.
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  #35  
Old 01-30-2009, 08:31 PM
Stee Stee is offline
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I laid down a carpet runner, tipped the safe onto its sides and got in front of it with my shoulder to it and my buddy gave it a push over the edge and I walked it down to the bottom then we both picked it up and put the fridge cart on it and walked it where we wanted it.
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  #36  
Old 01-30-2009, 08:52 PM
LHB1 LHB1 is offline
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This thread is TWO YEARS OLD!!
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  #37  
Old 01-30-2009, 10:56 PM
Ironhandjohn Ironhandjohn is offline
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A fridge dolly, a couple of friends, and a case of Dos Equis......
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  #38  
Old 01-30-2009, 11:43 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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This thread is TWO YEARS OLD!!
Good catch, I hadn't noticed that. However since it contains useful information we'll just keep it rolling.
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Try not to fall into the common trap of wanting to replace everything on your new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out, and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot it for at least 500 rounds, then decide what you don't like and want improved. Vintage 1911's should NEVER be refinished or modified because it ruins any value they had as a collectible firearm.
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  #39  
Old 01-30-2009, 11:46 PM
oldboondog oldboondog is offline
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How about a refrigerator?

I'm not sure how much my safe weighs, but I'm sure most refrigerators weigh a bit more than a lot of safes I've seen. Ever see a household mover move a big refrig? I've seen one guy handle it---it's all in knowing how and having the right combinations of straps etc. It only took two guys to move my medium size grand piano. Of course they took the legs off and stood it on one side. Safes don't have legs, so that should make it a bit easier!
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  #40  
Old 01-31-2009, 04:01 PM
brickeyee brickeyee is offline
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Quote:
I'm not sure how much my safe weighs, but I'm sure most refrigerators weigh a bit more than a lot of safes I've seen.
Refrigerators are actuality not very heavy at all.
The thick walls are full of insulation, and the metal used is very thin.

I have a large Kitchenaide side by said and it is less than 200 pounds.
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  #41  
Old 02-01-2009, 05:01 PM
CelticWarrior13 CelticWarrior13 is offline
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Originally Posted by Suppo View Post
A family friend moved ours last month using only a dolly. He did this by himself. No joke - by himself. When I saw him doing this, I ran to help. He just kept saying "stay out of the way."

We had no stairs, etc. The Penske truck had a lift-gate that we lowered from the truck to the garage floor.

It really was not the safest situation. However, the guy is just plain ol' tough.

I recommend 3-4 guys.

When I did my floors I moved mine (not too far but far enough!) by myself with a heavy duty dolly...not tough, just stupid on my part! I would suggest a couple of friends at least and I picked up a trick on here about dowels for moving or golf balls for making turns.

Good luck!
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  #42  
Old 03-25-2010, 07:28 PM
steve10121973 steve10121973 is offline
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Safe movers

I live in az and bought a safe from cabelas and new there was no way i could move the 1100 pound safe so the guy there at cabelas gave me a card of a moving company that moves the safes out of there.

Sothwest Safes was the name of the company and i tell you what it was worth every pennie i spent on them. It was 2 guys with all the right tools. They got it into the house and set into place boltted the safe to the floor and help with the lock. It may sound like a lot of money it cost me 400 dollars and im glad i spent the money the safe was set and not a mark on it.

Not sure if i can put there # But send me a e mail and i will send you the phone #

[email protected]
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  #43  
Old 03-25-2010, 09:15 PM
deldago deldago is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedster View Post
Thank you for the input everyone. I've pretty much decided to tackle this project myself instead of hiring it out. I've located a rental place that will rent me a heavy duty dollie that comes with the extra set of wheels so you can tilt the safe back and support it in that position. Because of where it's going in the house, I don't have to navigate any stairs, but I do have to cut through the yard to get to a back door. If I can get the thing off of the trailer, the rest of it should be fairly easy going I hope. :-)
If you are going through a soft area such as grass,use plywood sheets to keep the dolly from sinking into a soft spot.Two 4x8 sheets moved one after another will work fine.OMG,THIS THREAD IS NOW FOUR YEARS OLD,I HOPE TEDSTER HAS TWO SAFES SAFELY BOLTED DOWN BY NOW!
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Last edited by deldago; 03-25-2010 at 09:23 PM.
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  #44  
Old 03-26-2010, 09:31 AM
1911 MAN 1911 MAN is offline
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PVC and Golf Balls

I have just moved my 1000lb safe using the 2" PVC method and it went very well. It was on shag carpeting so no floor protection needed. A smaller safe I moved with the golf ball method and that worked fine also. Both these were on 1 level.
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  #45  
Old 03-26-2010, 09:50 AM
TheJH TheJH is offline
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Moved my 1000lbs safe with an old quilt.
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  #46  
Old 03-26-2010, 10:00 AM
bobtail_command bobtail_command is offline
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When I put my safe in my new house last summer I used a piece of carpet to move it. The safe weighs over 800 pounds and I am able to move it around my den by myself if I need to.

The problem with the golf ball method is if you are going across hard wood floors you will ruin them. The golf balls will leave huge dents in the flooring.

I took an extra piece of carpet and put it under the safe with the shaggy side down against the hardwood flooring. Then I took a box cutter and trimmed it flush so it doesn't really show.

My wife has me move my safe away from the wall in my den about once a month so she can sweep the dust bunnies and loose dog hair our from behind. All it takes is a good push and it will slide a foot or two.
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  #47  
Old 03-26-2010, 10:07 AM
TheJH TheJH is offline
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Originally Posted by bobtail_command View Post
When I put my safe in my new house last summer I used a piece of carpet to move it. The safe weighs over 800 pounds and I am able to move it around my den by myself if I need to.

The problem with the golf ball method is if you are going across hard wood floors you will ruin them. The golf balls will leave huge dents in the flooring.

I took an extra piece of carpet and put it under the safe with the shaggy side down against the hardwood flooring. Then I took a box cutter and trimmed it flush so it doesn't really show.

My wife has me move my safe away from the wall in my den about once a month so she can sweep the dust bunnies and loose dog hair our from behind. All it takes is a good push and it will slide a foot or two.
Wow, you are keep your safe in your den? That would never fly in my house.
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  #48  
Old 03-26-2010, 10:14 AM
gderf gderf is offline
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Originally Posted by bobtail_command View Post
I took an extra piece of carpet and put it under the safe with the shaggy side down against the hardwood flooring. Then I took a box cutter and trimmed it flush so it doesn't really show.

My wife has me move my safe away from the wall in my den about once a month so she can sweep the dust bunnies and loose dog hair our from behind. All it takes is a good push and it will slide a foot or two.
Other than leaving the safe unlocked or posting the combination on the door, the best thing you can do to aid a thief is to not bolt the safe down to the floor and/or wall. This allows them to push the safe over onto its back allowing them to gain a huge leverage advantage when attacking the door with pry bars.
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  #49  
Old 03-26-2010, 10:53 AM
bobtail_command bobtail_command is offline
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Wow, you are keep your safe in your den? That would never fly in my house.
The den is MY MAN CAVE!! Contains Gun Safe, Humidor, Gun Book Library, and some of my Army Awards and stuff. Also has the liquer cabinet in there too!!
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  #50  
Old 03-26-2010, 10:55 AM
bobtail_command bobtail_command is offline
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Originally Posted by gderf View Post
Other than leaving the safe unlocked or posting the combination on the door, the best thing you can do to aid a thief is to not bolt the safe down to the floor and/or wall. This allows them to push the safe over onto its back allowing them to gain a huge leverage advantage when attacking the door with pry bars.
Yeah I know. I need to bolt it down to the floor. I am replacing the hardwood floors this summer and am bolting it down once I get done.
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