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  #1  
Old 01-26-2006, 09:20 PM
mucky mucky is offline
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Want to reload. What do I need?




I'm looking to start reloading and wanted to know what I will need. I am very new to this and don't know to much. I have researched some of the presses on this site. I plan on reloading 45 ACP and 9mm. The presses I'm considering, after reading through this forum, will be a Dillon 550 or the 650 and maybe the Lee Load Master. I'm just not sure what I will need as a nessescity other than the press.

Also, any thoughts on primers, powder, cases, etc.., and other presses, would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you all,

Matt

Last edited by mucky; 01-26-2006 at 09:43 PM.
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  #2  
Old 01-26-2006, 11:32 PM
ten_ji ten_ji is offline
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I am still kinda new to the hobby so I will not recomend the components but here is some of the other stuff you'll need or want. Powder measure, scale, bullet puller, a good bench to mount it on, ABCs of reloading is a great book, at least one reloading manual but i like most here will recomend having a few different ones. Some sort of storage boxes/drawers to store all your components, bullets, primers, and brass. I still need to get a set of drawers for components, I am looking at one of the ones at lowes that you would put all your nuts ,bolts, screws (yes I have a few loose screws), that type of stuff.

i personally have a Lee Pro1000 for 45 and 357 and a RCBS Partner press single stage that I use for working up a round and my rifle cals. If you can afford to get a single stage along with a progresive I have found it nice to have around for figguing out the pefect load so you know exactly how to set everything for your progressive. I had my Partner press before I got the progresive and it really helped out learning how to reload. I have never used a blue (Dillon) press but I have heard and read a lot of great stuff about them.

hope all this helps
alex
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Last edited by ten_ji; 01-26-2006 at 11:40 PM.
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  #3  
Old 01-26-2006, 11:42 PM
Ol` Joe Ol` Joe is offline
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Get a good manual or two, the Lyman or Speer are a couple of the best IMO. They will let you know what you need and how to use them. Don`t worry about the load data just study the how to sections.
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  #4  
Old 01-27-2006, 12:46 AM
mucky mucky is offline
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Thanks for the info guys. Upon further research, I am now leaning towards a Lee Turret or the Dillon SDB. The 550 & 650 just seem like to much for what I'm gonig to do, which will be about 800 rnds a month at the most. If I'm lucky, I get to shoot once a week, not too often, and I usually won't shoot more than 300 rounds. I like the idea of an extra single press and I'm assuming these can be had relatively cheap.

I really want to know what press I should get.

Please keep the suggestions coming.

Thanks all,
Matt
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  #5  
Old 01-27-2006, 03:04 AM
eckerph eckerph is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ol` Joe
Get a good manual or two, the Lyman or Speer are a couple of the best IMO. They will let you know what you need and how to use them. Don`t worry about the load data just study the how to sections.
Thats prolly the best advice someone can give you.

As far as equipment i would stay away from lee presses,they are cheaply made and wont last as long as a Dillon however i do use the lee scale and powder dippers plus a hornady powder trickler for rifle rounds. If you want a good value on a progressive press that wont cost an arm and a leg take a look at the hornady lock-n-load. BTW i think lee dies are the best for the $ and use them to load 30-30, .45acp,30-06 and 7.5 swiss.
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  #6  
Old 01-27-2006, 06:52 AM
Big crush Big crush is offline
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Quote:
I'm just not sure what I will need as a nessescity other than the press.
You will also need a good set of dial calipers, a powder weight scale, a reloading manual, a case gage and access to a chronograph would be very helpfull. Before you decide on powder, primers, cases and heads reading is very helpful.
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  #7  
Old 01-27-2006, 07:54 AM
sarhog sarhog is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mucky
I'm looking to start reloading and wanted to know what I will need. I am very new to this and don't know to much. I have researched some of the presses on this site. I plan on reloading 45 ACP and 9mm. The presses I'm considering, after reading through this forum, will be a Dillon 550 or the 650 and maybe the Lee Load Master. I'm just not sure what I will need as a nessescity other than the press.

Also, any thoughts on primers, powder, cases, etc.., and other presses, would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you all,

Matt
I found this site to be very helpful.
It is Dillon specific, but it spells out all the extras that you will need, as well as nice to have things.
Good luck.
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  #8  
Old 01-27-2006, 11:46 AM
ValleyBoy ValleyBoy is offline
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A good scale, elecronic calipers (for your eyes), new manuals ( refer to my posting), and patience. I also like my L-N-L.
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  #9  
Old 01-27-2006, 12:09 PM
dodgestdshift dodgestdshift is offline
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Here is my list of the stuff you will need in approximate order of importance (as judged by me).


Reloading Equipment

1) Reloading Manuals – Important for first timers. At least one manual should be obtained which contains sections on how to, equipment, questions, etc. This will allow the perspective handloader to get the “feel” of reloading with a very minimal investment. If he/she chooses not to continue he is only out the price of the manual. Good manuals are Speer, Hornady, Sierra, and Hodgden. After a good manual is purchased it will be used whenever the handloader wishes loading information.

2) Reloading Scale (balance beam) - No loading operation should ever be attempted without the use of a scale
3) Reloading Scale (digital) (digital or balance beam) or eye protection.
4) Eye protection
5) Check weights - Useful for checking your scale.
6) Reloading Press - Single stage or Progressive
7) Reloading Dies
8) Shell holders
9) Bullet puller (inertial or collet) - I have both, though I have never used the collet version. Useful for mistakes, and adjusting your bullet seating die. Large jobs probably make the collet version faster. For small jobs the inertial puller is more efficient. You can use a shell holder for your press instead of the chuck that came with the puller. It will work better.
10) Caliper
11) Funnel
12) Case lube - If you can get carbide sizing dies for the calibers you intend to load, you won’t need this.
13) Case trimmer
14) Deburring tool
15) Stuck Case Remover
16) Micrometer
17) Reloading trays
18) Ammo boxes
19) Powder measure
20) Vibrating case cleaner/media
21) Strainer/separator - Separates media from cases.
22) Priming tool
23) Case neck lubricator
24) Universal decap die - Extremely useful. I don’t know how I got along without it. With it I can deprime before cleaning. Then vibrate clean the cases with the old primers removed, and the vibrator will also partially clean the primer pocket.
25) Chronograph
26) Electronic load dispenser - Teams with the digital reloading scale.
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  #10  
Old 01-27-2006, 02:06 PM
eskinner eskinner is offline
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(On very little experience,) I'd suggest the Dillon Square Deal B for several reasons. Although the dies are unique to that press, they are of good quality and should last a long time. (You can find used ones on Ebay but my experience with Ebay auctions is you'll end up spending more than new prices sometimes. Be careful!)
Secondly, and very important to me (I have an SDB) is that it auto-indexes. That is, when you crank the lever, it advances the rounds automatically. That makes it much more difficult to drop a double-charge which would be very, very dangerous when fired. (I position a light so I can look in each case and verify that the charge "looks right". Not very scientific, of course, but better than not looking at all.)
The 550 does not auto-index.
The 650 auto-indexes and you can add a "powder check" to verify the load but the salesman in the Dillon store said it was accurate to "a few grains" with emphasis on the plural. I told him I was loading about four grains total. He said the powder check might NOT catch a double-load for such a light charge.
With the SDB I can turn out (after not much experience) about 300 rounds in two hours which is kind of the right amount of time I want to put into it. Less than that and I'm spending too large a proportion on setup and cleanup, and more than that and I get bored and start to worry I'm not paying adequate attention. I shoot just under 1000 rounds per month so that's roughly three or four evenings a month to reload. That's an OK amount of time from my schedule.
The 650 is MUCH faster but you'll also spend a LOT more.
If you start with an SDB (as I did), you can later upgrade to a 650 by selling what you've got at close to your original investment. Dillons hold their value.
And if either breaks, Dillon is wonderful at supplying replacement parts at no cost. (Been there, done that.)
Good luck!
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  #11  
Old 01-27-2006, 11:57 PM
mucky mucky is offline
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Thanks everyone. After reading dodgestdshift's post, Can anyone tell me what I will need to get started. His list is rather large.

I know I need a press, the appropriate die's, and a scale.

What other hardware is a must to get me started. I know I would eventually like to get all the little things that make reloading more enjoyable, but I can't afford it all at once.

Thanks for all the advice,

Matt
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  #12  
Old 01-28-2006, 09:53 AM
eskinner eskinner is offline
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A minimum would have to include:
Press (Dillon SDB and it comes with one set of dies and includes primer and powder measure)
Four-inch tweezers to remove/replace the little pins at each station in the SDB since my fingers are too clumsy to do this without help
Balance beam scale (I bought my SDB used and it came with the Dillon scale -- works great)
Eye and ear protection
Fire extinguisher close but well enough away so you can approach it when the workbench goes up (REAL FAST)
RCBS check weights (you'll be working in the 3-8 grain range so get the lightest set)
Inertial bullet puller
Digital calipers (only about $10-15 more than the dial variety)
Powder funnel (you will dump every 10th load into the scale to check it, and then back into the shell using the funnel)
Ammo boxes (I prefer the 50 round size -- 1000 rounds is 20 boxes)
Home-made paper labels, one per box, to record the details (bullet, charge, primer, etc.) and date
Primer flipper (very cool, very cool)
Case cleaner (vibrating type)
Cleaning media
Strainer/separator (I use the one that looks like I'd be panning for gold but has holes in it, and a bucket to hold it to while shaking and stirring out all the media)
Small containers for empty clean brass in storage (ziplock baggies, 100 rounds each)
Small container for empty brass while reloading (butter tub?)
Safe place to store primers
Safe place to store propellant
Table top and floor from which spilled powder can be completely swept up (don't use a vacuum)
Small sweeper and pan
Trash can -- empty as part of the clean-up operation because what's in there may be dangerous!
Good light in the work area
Small "spot" light to shine into shell after powder drop and visually check the qty therein
Place to put reloader instruction book, reloading manuals, and notebook in which to write loads and experience (a diary of your reloading operations)
No TV, no radio, no phone, no distractions, maybe not even a clock
Consumables: primers, propellant, bullets (heads) and an initial supply of brass (I accumulated mine from store-bought ammo and miscellaneous donations from other shooters, intentional and unintentional [pick-ups at the range])
Patience with yourself
Honesty with self to stop and undo if in doubt
Sense to stop when distracted or become tired

Last edited by eskinner; 01-28-2006 at 10:24 AM.
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  #13  
Old 01-29-2006, 10:47 AM
dodgestdshift dodgestdshift is offline
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Muchy:

As long as you are only loading straight sided cases (9MM & 45 ACP are straigth sided) you will need:

1) Reloading Manuals – Absolutely essential.
2) Reloading Scale (balance beam) - No loading operation should ever be attempted without the use of a scale. either balance beam or digital. A volumentric measure is not a substitute for a scale.
3) Eye protection
4) reloading Press - Single stage or Progressive
5) Reloading Dies - Get the carbide sizing dies so you don't need to lube the cases.
6) Shell holders
7) Bullet puller (inertial or collet) - You can get along without it BUT as soon as you start setting up your seating die, or make an error you will want one badly.
8) Funnel - You won't need one with a progressive right away, but pretty soon you will decide that it would come in handy. Cheap to purchase.
9) Reloading trays - Handy to hold cases so they won't tip over, again cheap but nice to have.
10) Ammo boxes - somewhere to put your loaded rounds.

If you decide to "graduate" to rifle you probably will eventually accumulate the rest of the stuff I mentioned above.
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Last edited by dodgestdshift; 01-29-2006 at 10:51 AM.
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  #14  
Old 01-29-2006, 05:53 PM
mucky mucky is offline
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Anyone have a suggestion as to what press I should purchase. Should I go a Turret style or progressive. I like the idea of the progressive.If i go the cheaper route, I will start reloading soon. If I got the more costly route, like the SDB or the Hornaday LNL, I will have to wait to save a little cash. Keep in mind that this is something that I don't need to start right away and I have no problem spending the money on a good press. from my research, it looks like Dilon is the way to go.

I apperciate everyone's help,

Matt
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  #15  
Old 01-30-2006, 02:22 PM
dodgestdshift dodgestdshift is offline
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Muchy:

It all depends on the amount of ammo you intend to shoot. A single stage press, will keep you in more ammo that you will normally shoot. It can easily load 300-500 rds per week. You will spend 1 to 2 hours a night for maybe 3 to 5 days a week keeping up that output. As you get used to reloading on the press you will go faster (don't get going too fast). This is a guess because, I only shoot about 50 - 100 rds per week. Think about it, 100 rounds a week, every week for a year is a lot of shooting. Be honest with yourself when estimating the amount of shooting per week.

If you are planning to go into competitive shooting, and need a thousand rounds for competition and practice you will probably need a progressive. Remember a lot of the time consuming work, (examining cases, cleaning cases, etc) are not sped up with a progressive.

I have been using the RCBS rockchucker single stage press for over 30 years, and it has never given me a problem. It will probably be going great for my grandchildren when they want to load.
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  #16  
Old 01-30-2006, 09:11 PM
mucky mucky is offline
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When I shoot, I shoot about 300- 400 rounds for an hour and 150-200 rnds in a half hour sitting.This is combining 45acp and 9mm.lately I've been going once a week, but I just bought a new CZ P-01 and I gotta paly with my new toy. I will eventually probally only shoot twice a month on aveerage. I think I will probally get the progressive press. I would rather put out a couple hundred rounds an hour rather than trying to load 300 rnds in a 3-5 hour period in the same amount of days, with the single stage press. I don't need to go super fast , but would like to utilize my time better, especially with my first child coming in 3 months.

Thanks for the help,
Matt
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