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  #1  
Old 07-01-2004, 01:15 PM
double8 double8 is offline
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How to adjust trigger pull?




Can someone tell me a GOOD way to lessen the trigger pull on my S.A 1911 loaded series? I find myself flinching as the pull is too much, I would love a "hair trigger" thanks

Last edited by double8; 07-01-2004 at 01:18 PM.
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  #2  
Old 07-01-2004, 01:30 PM
stumbler stumbler is offline
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Check out Shane45-1911's thread in the "How to" section.
It is on Brownell's site.

Sorry, but link does not seem to work. Let me get back with you.

Last edited by stumbler; 07-01-2004 at 01:34 PM.
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  #3  
Old 07-01-2004, 01:38 PM
stumbler stumbler is offline
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http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/Gun...?p=0&t=1&i=349

You may have to setup a login name and password to have access on the Brownells site.
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  #4  
Old 07-01-2004, 01:58 PM
Sully2 Sully2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by double8
Can someone tell me a GOOD way to lessen the trigger pull on my S.A 1911 loaded series? I find myself flinching as the pull is too much, I would love a "hair trigger" thanks
1) Shoot hell out of it
2) Get rid ( if you havent already) of their UNGODLY main/hammer spring and go to a 20 pounder
3) "Tinker" with the sear spring ...gently...gently..
4) Detail strip and apply ( various sorts of wonder lubes) I used TETRA GREASE..as a ONE TIME APPLICATION on the hammer/sear faces...and shoot it to get it good and warmed up.

If the above dont do it...see your pistol smith.
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  #5  
Old 07-01-2004, 02:18 PM
vincent vincent is offline
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Unless you know what you are doing take/send the pistol to a gunsmith and have the trigger setup to your needs.

If you try any home adjustments be sure to test the work by loading only one or two rounds in the magazine in case it goes full auto.
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  #6  
Old 07-01-2004, 02:19 PM
Dave Berryhill Dave Berryhill is offline
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Sorry but I've got to make a comment here. Nothing personal against double8 but I see posts like this frequently and it makes me cringe! There are plenty of people who can do a quality trigger job. Some of them are professional gunsmiths, some of them are amateur gunsmiths but they all have the necessary training and experience to do it safely. Making a comment like "I would love a hair trigger" makes me believe that you've gotten most of your firearms training from TV and the movies. Performing a trigger job on a 1911 is not the same thing as bolting a wing on the back of your Honda! There is much potential for injury from a bad trigger job. If you have to ask "how do I adjust the trigger on my gun?" then you probably shouldn't be messing with it.

There are also several function and safety checks that should be performed, especially if you change or modify the sear, hammer or trigger. You might have to modify the thumb and/or grip safety as well. There are certain things you should do when you test fire the pistol for the first time.

Sorry for the rant but I think you should only attempt it after you have had
some type of training. In the mean time, learn all you can about your weapon.
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  #7  
Old 07-01-2004, 02:23 PM
Mus Mus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Berryhill
Performing a trigger job on a 1911 is not the same thing as bolting a wing on the back of your Honda! There is much potential for injury from a bad trigger job.
ROFL. Good point Dave. Its more like dicking around with the brakes eh?
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  #8  
Old 07-01-2004, 02:30 PM
CastleBravo CastleBravo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by double8
Can someone tell me a GOOD way to lessen the trigger pull on my S.A 1911 loaded series?
Pay somebody qualified to do it. If you have to ask us how to do it, the odds that you will safely pull off a 2.5 lb trigger job are hovering around zero.
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  #9  
Old 07-01-2004, 04:29 PM
1911WB 1911WB is offline
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1911 trigger pull

there are two things just about anyone knowledgeable about 1911's can do to lighten the trigger pull without getting into trouble. One that Sully mentioned is to take out the mainspring housing and replace the very heavy mainspring with a 20# one. While I was doing that one I replaced SA's silly ILS system with standard mainspring assembly parts and a retaining pin. The second thing is to replace the SA sear spring (which isn't very good) with a Nowlin or Colt. These two things should give you about a 1 lb. reduction in pull weight. If the trigger is gritty or has other issues, I would then turn it over to an expert.
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  #10  
Old 07-01-2004, 05:02 PM
Nathan Nathan is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Berryhill
Performing a trigger job on a 1911 is not the same thing as bolting a wing on the back of your Honda!
Hey, that isn't easy either!!

Quote:
There is much potential for injury from a bad trigger job. If you have to ask "how do I adjust the trigger on my gun?" then you probably shouldn't be messing with it.
I agree, wholeheartedly. Let me add that you cannot teach yourself to do a good one for what a good trigger job costs.

Truthfully, there are no user level adjustable parts in the trigger action. JMB was a great firearm designer. Most parts in the 1911 serve mutiple functions. If you tweak the sear spring, you affect more than pull weight. If you adjust anything, a complete safety/function check must be preformed. Also, the gun may fail a check and need a new part or another part adjusted. If your only goal is a better trigger job, I would find your favorite smith from this board and PM him on whether he can meet your cost and timing needs.
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  #11  
Old 07-01-2004, 05:53 PM
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RickB RickB is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1911WB
there are two things just about anyone knowledgeable about 1911's can do to lighten the trigger pull without getting into trouble. One that Sully mentioned is to take out the mainspring housing and replace the very heavy mainspring with a 20# one. While I was doing that one I replaced SA's silly ILS system with standard mainspring assembly parts and a retaining pin.
Do replace all the ILS internals, and not just the spring, if you go that route. I know two people who just swapped the spring out, and they ended up with guns that had hammer follow and/or doubled or tripled when fired.
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  #12  
Old 07-01-2004, 07:48 PM
Sully2 Sully2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickB
Do replace all the ILS internals, and not just the spring, if you go that route. I know two people who just swapped the spring out, and they ended up with guns that had hammer follow and/or doubled or tripled when fired.
Yepper!! The whole shebang is cheap enough to do that...I even swapped MSHousings at the same time so that I really didnt have to dis-assemble anything.
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  #13  
Old 07-01-2004, 10:40 PM
DBR1911 DBR1911 is offline
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I agree that you should get your trigger down to a good 3 1/2# to 4# pull. If you cannot shoot well with a trigger in that weight range then the problem is you, not the gun. A "hair trigger" is not the answer to poor shooting skills. You will just flinch sooner as you become accustomed to the lighter trigger.

Last edited by DBR1911; 07-01-2004 at 10:56 PM.
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  #14  
Old 07-02-2004, 04:09 AM
stumbler stumbler is offline
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I was trying to get double8 to look at other parts of the forum. People ask questions, we know the answers (or the answer is here somewhere). I do not know the experience level of each person. I hope that as a responsible gun owner, an individual knows what they are capable of doing in the gunsmith area. IMO, if I don't understand how to do something, I will ask. If the steps involved are beyond what I can do, then I get a pro.
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  #15  
Old 07-02-2004, 08:05 AM
BrianMajors BrianMajors is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stumbler
I was trying to get double8 to look at other parts of the forum. People ask questions, we know the answers (or the answer is here somewhere). I do not know the experience level of each person. I hope that as a responsible gun owner, an individual knows what they are capable of doing in the gunsmith area. IMO, if I don't understand how to do something, I will ask. If the steps involved are beyond what I can do, then I get a pro.
I have to agree. While I certainly do understand the risks involved with firearm "tinkering", especially with a defense gun, I'm the kind of guy who must do it myself if at all possible. That's the beauty of this forum, and that's the beauty of our "How-To" section. Just my .02

Thanks,
Brian
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Last edited by BrianMajors; 07-02-2004 at 08:06 AM. Reason: Spelling Error
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