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  #1  
Old 05-27-2012, 04:01 PM
Marcus99 Marcus99 is offline
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Breaking in a Valor




Is there a particular procedure I should follow when putting the initial 500 or so rounds through a new Valor SS? I know Kimber has the whole thing regarding a "break in period", do Dan Wessons subscribe to the same philosophy? Specifically, I've set aside 200rds of 230gr WWB from Walmart which I plan to reload off that brass. Is there any reason I shouldn't break it in using 200rds of factory and then my reloads? I plan on using W231 since I have a lot on hand and it seems popular for .45acp, is there a common load that works well in Valors that I can use to get me started? Also, what is the deal with approptiate amount of lube. Do I run it super wet or just damp, especially during the break in period, and should I use the lube supplied with the Valor? Any other break in/.45 reloading/general Valor advice is appreciated.
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  #2  
Old 05-27-2012, 04:29 PM
LSglock89 LSglock89 is offline
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Shoot it...I'm probably a touch over 250 rds through my Valor...I've just been using a decent amount of the supplied lube and shooting it. Only issues so far seem to be mag related.
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  #3  
Old 05-27-2012, 04:45 PM
mjkortan mjkortan is offline
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Run it wet for the first 500 don't skimp on lube.
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  #4  
Old 05-29-2012, 11:41 AM
Marcus99 Marcus99 is offline
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Anyone else? I thought breaking in a 1911 was a big deal, was expecting a few more replies than this.
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  #5  
Old 05-29-2012, 11:58 AM
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asiparks asiparks is offline
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nah, people wayyyyyyy overstress on "break in"...
Kimber suggest it as a way to mash the burrs and rough edges off their more averagely fitted parts until they work together.

I've never broken in a gun other than clean it, lube it, shoot it, wipe it down afterwards.

Have a couple of spare mags in case one plays silly buggers.
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Last edited by asiparks; 05-29-2012 at 12:01 PM.
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  #6  
Old 05-29-2012, 12:43 PM
sheepdog101 sheepdog101 is offline
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You might try here.

http://forums.1911forum.com/showthread.php?t=251781

"Search" will help a lot as there is a ton of information on this forum if you look for it.
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  #7  
Old 05-29-2012, 02:13 PM
Dangerous Dangerous is offline
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Dog101 has the answer and the answer is Bald1.
Been doing that since 1958 or so to all my new and new to me 1911s. It may be a coincidence but I have had very few problems with pistols that start off that way. YMMV
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  #8  
Old 05-29-2012, 06:33 PM
AzDave AzDave is offline
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It's usually a good idea to, at the very least, field strip a new gun. Check for burrs, clean parts, and apply a liberal coat of oil. Put it back together, do your safety checks, and rack the slide several times to feel if the gun is right. Double checking trigger action and safeties.

The liberal use of oil is more true for a 1911 than many others. I've run Glocks out of the box, but a Daniel Defense M4 I bought some time ago was dry as a bone out of the box.

I usually don't totally strip a new gun, but one time I recall doing it was a Kimber CDP Compact that had a metal chip in the in the Main Spring Housing. Would it have caused an issue? Can't say for sure. Sure doesn't hurt to totally strip if you plan to use for self defense.

Your DW should run out of the box. Break in helps to get things running a bit more smoothly and help build your confidence in the gun, and sort out any magazine or shooter issues.

I usually like to run a 100 or so factory rounds through before switching to my reloads just to be on the safe side. I've not had any problems with my loads, but just makes me feel more comfortable.

Hard to reccommend a load without knowing the bullets you plan to use. I typically use Berry's plated. You may use jacketed. I do use 231, so you should check a manual for your preffered bullet.
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  #9  
Old 05-31-2012, 10:14 PM
GDoily GDoily is offline
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My Valor manual clearly stated the gun should be stripped, cleaned and lubricated before firing. It also suggested factory ball ammo only for the first 500 rounds (I believe it was 500 - don't have it with me).
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  #10  
Old 06-01-2012, 08:20 AM
cdhbrad cdhbrad is online now
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I broke in my Stainless Valor the same way I did a LB Premier II I bought around the same time: cycled the slide a number of times to check for binding and found none, lubed slide rails and exposed edges when the slide was locked, the hammer pivot area at the top of frame, and disco on top of frame liberally with CLP, wiped off excess lube, shot about 400-500 rounds of ball ammo before field stripping with additional lube during and after every range session.

Worked perfectly and the slide and trigger actually are smoother than the Baer.
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  #11  
Old 06-01-2012, 09:57 AM
davidalyn davidalyn is offline
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Lube it up real good......then shoot it!

The question I always ask myself when these threads pop up is: How do you decide when it is "broken in"?

I just inspect them, twink what I think needs twinked, lube them up and shoot them.
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  #12  
Old 06-01-2012, 07:12 PM
BPHORSEGUY BPHORSEGUY is offline
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Its "broken in" when I have fired a few hundred rounds w/ no failures with a couple of different mags and different loads. Then I will carry it !
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  #13  
Old 06-01-2012, 08:33 PM
JAS JAS is offline
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Take it apart. Use 91% isopropyl alcohol, not 70%, and clean the whole gun. This removes all oils that are in the pores of the metal. This is important because other products you apply will just float on the old stuff.

Then use Mil-comm 25B grease on all the contact points, this includes the barrel, slide and frame contact points, hammer, etc. Use Mil-Comm 2500 on everything else. Be pretty liberal on the oil the first time. Not a "white" film but heavy. What happens is that the the grease/oil helps protect the parts under friction, and gets into the the pores of the steel . Then you can lower the application of the grease (25B) amount to only the spots where you see contact marks when cleaning the gun after shooting it. Still use 2500 on everything else.

Best,

JAS
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  #14  
Old 06-02-2012, 07:25 PM
jackjr jackjr is offline
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Load for the Valor

I use 5.5gr. of W231 with Winchester or Remington 230gr. FMJ and find it to work well in my Pointman.
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  #15  
Old 06-03-2012, 06:37 AM
jfwest jfwest is offline
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Like others have said, so long as it isn't a Kimber, the break in stuff gets way too much attention. Just take it out and shoot it. You'll know when it is ready.
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  #16  
Old 06-03-2012, 08:41 PM
sheepdog101 sheepdog101 is offline
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Well.................? Did you get her broke in yet?

You should have been able to hand cycle the slide about 85,000 times by now.......
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  #17  
Old 06-05-2012, 04:19 PM
Marcus99 Marcus99 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheepdog101 View Post
Well.................? Did you get her broke in yet?

You should have been able to hand cycle the slide about 85,000 times by now.......
This was a preemptive question. My 2012 Valor is on order, hopefully I'll get it sometime this summer.

I appreciate the replies, and I see the extensive process recommended in the linked thread for preparing a Dan Wesson for break-in. I'm hesitant to detail strip my Valor to that degree because I am totally unfamiliar with the 1911 platform; I do not want to undertake that process until I have some hands on time with my Valor. Running it very wet for the first few hundred rounds seems like the general consensus.

I have about 125 rounds of Winchester 230gr ball ammo, with 100 more in my reserve (first .45 gun). I already bought the components to reload .45, so if i can jump right in and use my reloads after 225rds of factory ammo I'd be happy.
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Old 06-05-2012, 04:27 PM
GunBugBit GunBugBit is offline
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I detail stripped and oiled my Valor before I shot it.

Rather, I TRIED to detail strip it and found that I could not do it until I'd let some oil into its parts.

After the field strip, I oiled the whole outside of the barrel, the slide rails, and down between the hammer and sear.

Only during the first shooting session, and with a factory DW (CheckMate) mag, have I ever had a malf.

After that, it's been smooth sailing with all mags and all ammo.

I continue to run it well oiled.
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Old 06-05-2012, 05:31 PM
sheepdog101 sheepdog101 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcus99 View Post
This was a preemptive question. My 2012 Valor is on order, hopefully I'll get it sometime this summer.

I appreciate the replies, and I see the extensive process recommended in the linked thread for preparing a Dan Wesson for break-in. I'm hesitant to detail strip my Valor to that degree because I am totally unfamiliar with the 1911 platform; I do not want to undertake that process until I have some hands on time with my Valor. Running it very wet for the first few hundred rounds seems like the general consensus.

I have about 125 rounds of Winchester 230gr ball ammo, with 100 more in my reserve (first .45 gun). I already bought the components to reload .45, so if i can jump right in and use my reloads after 225rds of factory ammo I'd be happy.
I understand, but I would at least field strip it, clean the rails and hand cycle it a couple of hundred times while wet.
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Old 06-05-2012, 05:31 PM
AzDave AzDave is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcus99 View Post
This was a preemptive question. My 2012 Valor is on order, hopefully I'll get it sometime this summer.

I'm hesitant to detail strip my Valor to that degree because I am totally unfamiliar with the 1911 platform; I do not want to undertake that process until I have some hands on time with my Valor. Running it very wet for the first few hundred rounds seems like the general consensus.

I already bought the components to reload .45, so if i can jump right in and use my reloads after 225rds of factory ammo I'd be happy.
Follow the manual. DW recommends disassembly and cleaning/lubing the top end. Slide, barrel, rails, moving parts. That's generally what I do on 99% of pistols I've bought, and exactly what I did for my new VBOB.
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  #21  
Old 06-05-2012, 06:03 PM
BPHORSEGUY BPHORSEGUY is offline
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I think some of you guys are confusing detail strip w/ field strip. There is no reason to detail strip!
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  #22  
Old 06-05-2012, 07:39 PM
Marcus99 Marcus99 is offline
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Originally Posted by sheepdog101 View Post
I understand, but I would at least field strip it, clean the rails and hand cycle it a couple of hundred times while wet.
+1 Horseguy. Yeah, obviously I'm going to field strip it and liberally lubricate it before taking it to the range. It was the detail stripping that people were recommending that concerned me; not about to jump into something like that on a gun of this value without being familiar with the platform. A youtube video or internet writeup doesn't suffice for actual range time IMO.
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  #23  
Old 06-05-2012, 09:16 PM
Dangerous Dangerous is offline
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Originally Posted by BPHORSEGUY View Post
I think some of you guys are confusing detail strip w/ field strip. There is no reason to detail strip!

I don't think most are confusing the two. I always detail a new to me 1911. I want to see the sear/hammer engagement and other things. I check for burrs and various other problems. I address anything I don't like before shooting and I hand cycle the slide on the frame at least two hundred times without the barrel and another 200 fully assembled.

Naturally, you can do what you want. I have been shooting 1911s for over 50 years and this is what works for me.

For reloads try 5.2 grains of W231/HP38 with 230 grain FMJ. Make sure to use your barrel (out of the gun) for the plunk test.
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Old 06-05-2012, 09:43 PM
Jessebolt Jessebolt is offline
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Quote:
It was the detail stripping that people were recommending that concerned me; not about to jump into something like that on a gun of this value without being familiar with the platform. A youtube video or internet writeup doesn't suffice for actual range time IMO.
"Range" time isn't going to teach you a thing about disassembly.

I had never taken apart a 1911 before I purchased mine a couple of months ago either. I did look over several videos and write-ups online before I got mine, with intentions to completely strip it before shooting it. It ain't rocket science, it's actually pretty easy.

I took the gun completely apart and de-greased it with alcohol. While I had it apart I thoroughly inspected it for any possible imperfections that might cause problems. Then oiled/lubed it while reassembling. Then sat and watched TV for awhile while racking the slide over and over and over. Field stripped it and wiped it down inspecting it again. Re-lubed and was ready for some range time then. After a few hundred flawless rounds I came home and detail stripped it again, cleaning and inspecting and re-lubing upon reassembly.

Complete stripping is easy and builds confidence in you knowing your firearm and any little idiosyncrasies it might have. And helps you to notice any potential problems before they become something major.
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  #25  
Old 06-05-2012, 10:02 PM
BPHORSEGUY BPHORSEGUY is offline
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Originally Posted by Dangerous View Post
I don't think most are confusing the two. I always detail a new to me 1911. I want to see the sear/hammer engagement and other things. I check for burrs and various other problems. I address anything I don't like before shooting and I hand cycle the slide on the frame at least two hundred times without the barrel and another 200 fully assembled.

Naturally, you can do what you want. I have been shooting 1911s for over 50 years and this is what works for me.

For reloads try 5.2 grains of W231/HP38 with 230 grain FMJ. Make sure to use your barrel (out of the gun) for the plunk test.
Dangerous, it sounds like you are very qualified to do what you are doing but obviously some are not and the confusion in terms is not going to help them.
Most only need to field strip, inspect, lube and reassemble, those that are armorer qualified or close to, can do more!
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