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  #1  
Old 05-24-2012, 10:45 PM
zanthor zanthor is offline
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Crimp Die Question




I just got my Lee Loadmaster and the dies it came with don't include a crimp die... is this something I need to load rounds for my 1911?
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  #2  
Old 05-24-2012, 11:14 PM
skosh69 skosh69 is offline
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Yes, you will need a crimp die for shooting a 1911. Lee die sets have a separate die for crimping. You'll need to buy the "deluxe pistol 4 die set" if you haven't bought dies yet or just the "crimping die" if you have already.

Make sure you get the "taper" crimp die and not the "roll" crimp die!
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  #3  
Old 05-24-2012, 11:36 PM
Fa2 Fa2 is offline
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Was this a kit with dies? I would have thought Lee would include the 4 die set with a kit.
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  #4  
Old 05-25-2012, 12:29 AM
noylj noylj is offline
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The seating die should have a crimp section in it. If you seat and crimp in one step, you will need to first get the COL correct, then adjust the crimp, and then re-adjust the seating stem. It is covered in the instructions.
ALWAYS READ ALL THE DIRECTIONS, PARTICULARLY FOR LEE PRODUCTS.
You can go to Leeprecision.com and watch videos on die set-up.
I would order a Lee taper crimp die over the Lee Factory Crimp Die, as I have always kept the two operations separate.
For a 5-station press, normal set-up would be:
1) size, then primer on down stroke
2) expand case, flare/bell case mouth, and dispense powder
3) RCBS Lock-Out die
4) seat bullet
5) crimp
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  #5  
Old 05-25-2012, 02:49 AM
zanthor zanthor is offline
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I worded my original post poorly, I am more after what is the benefit of seating the bullet separate from crimping? It seems to me that to do it in a single step I'd actually be shoving the bullet to depth at the same time the die is crimping the round, where if you split this into two steps I'd see this running smoother... Is that the crux of it?
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  #6  
Old 05-25-2012, 02:52 AM
Mettalikatt Mettalikatt is offline
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This is all making my head spin.. Making reloading look like it's more headache than I'd like
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  #7  
Old 05-25-2012, 02:55 AM
Mettalikatt Mettalikatt is offline
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Also the description for tapered dies say they offer no advantage with 86' or newer dies.
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  #8  
Old 05-25-2012, 05:16 AM
Nick A Nick A is offline
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Hi, zanthor. Your two posts seem to ask two different questions.

1. The Loadmaster is a 5 station press, which means it has a hole for a separate crimp die. You'll have to call Lee Precision to see if it should have included a separate crimp die. Lee makes several different kinds of dedicated crimp dies, and of course the seating die is also a crimp die. You'll have to ask them what was supposed to come with the press. If it should have been shipped with a separate crimp die, make them send you one free.

2. Crimping in separate stages has advantanges, but isn't always necessary. It's one of those wisdom judgment decisions you make as the operator. Even though we've covered that subject a half million times on the Reloading Bench subforum, it's easy to discuss again. [First let's reiterate that the crimp in a basic 45/40/9/38Super cartridge for 1911 doesn't require a crimp to hold the bullet, the only value of the crimp is to remove the bell you created to seat the bullet, thus overcrimping is a problem no matter what stage you perform the operation.] The seating die continues to push the bullet into the case as the ram is moving, including the last 0.05" of stroke. That last 5-hundredths inch is where it also crimps the case mouth, if the die body is adjusted to crimp. Sometimes crimping the case mouth interferes with bullet movement in that last 5-hundredths, but not that often. It depends upon several factors: Bullet material (full jacket is tough, plated is softer, lead is much softer), amount of bell on the case mouth (the less you bell, the less effort removing it), the type of crimp (revolver uses a roll crimp, semi-auto doesn't need that), the profile of the crimp die, and the diameter of the cartridge. And of course, overcrimping makes the problem worse, or creates a problem that wouldn't exist.

Generally speaking, the common cartridges used in the 1911 pistol can be easily seated and crimped in one step with most good dies when properly adjusted using commonly available bullets, as long as you don't overbell and don't overcrimp. It works great if everything is just right. Crimping in a separate step is always a good idea if you don't happen to get everything just right, which is most of us who reload most of the time. Even highly experienced guys find that crimping in a separate step 'takes the load off' mentally. And any time you an improve your mental state, it's a good thing.

So the bottom line: You can do perfectly well by seating and crimping in the same station if you take care to get everything adjusted properly, or you can do perfectly well (with a lot less hassle) seating and crimping in separate stations.
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  #9  
Old 05-25-2012, 05:18 AM
rfd rfd is offline
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imho, there is no absolute need for the lee factory crimp die, in terms of making the taper crimp for .45acp rounds. any proper bullet seating die for .45acp will do a very *slight* taper crimp, that's all that's needed and no more. since this caliber head spaces off the case mouth, there *must* be an exposed case mouth edge showing. the lfcd does more than crimp - it's a factory spec resizing die that is s'posed to "insure rounds are factory sized". neck tension alone on all round calibers that head space on the case mouth is all that's needed. ymmv.
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Old 05-25-2012, 05:18 AM
rfd rfd is offline
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aaaaaaaaaaa nick, you beat me this time!
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  #11  
Old 05-25-2012, 05:20 AM
Nick A Nick A is offline
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  #12  
Old 05-25-2012, 08:52 AM
dickttx dickttx is online now
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The biggest advantage of the FCD, to me, is that it is much easier to adjust both the seating and the taper with separate dies while you are working up a load. Doing it with one die, everytime you adjust one, you also have to adjust the other. And if you change bullets you have to do it all over again.
If you are using two dies and change bullets your crimp will probably stay the same and you only have to adjust the seater. If you want to go back to the original you only have to insert a loaded round or dummy and adjust the seater to that.
Kind of like a manual transmission or an auto in your car.
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  #13  
Old 06-01-2012, 08:25 AM
zanthor zanthor is offline
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My Factory Crimp Die came in yesterday and I set it up. I didn't do any large production but the first thing I noticed is how much more consistent the pressure seems to be. It seems that crimping and seating takes a lot more pressure for the last bit of the stroke!
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