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  #1  
Old 05-24-2012, 11:52 PM
DCW DCW is offline
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S&w 586




Found a 586 in the local pawn shop yesterday. Older one without IL and transfer bar. I want quite a bit but it was noticeably worn with slight rust and the guy wanted $600 for it. I'm thinking I should just buy a brand new one but the IL and transfer bar kind of bother me. What do you guys think?

Edit: I haven't asked if he'd lower his price yet, which might ne a determining factor.
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  #2  
Old 05-25-2012, 01:15 AM
srv1 srv1 is offline
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If it has rust then most likely the rest of it does. Not worth $600 if it is just a common 586. If you can find out what exact model it is by opening up the cylinder and looking on the crane, then you can tell. If you really want a 586, check out smith-wessonforum.com.

James
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  #3  
Old 05-25-2012, 01:29 AM
sbeatty1983 sbeatty1983 is offline
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way over priced considering you could find a nice 27-2 for a few bucks more.
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  #4  
Old 05-25-2012, 02:41 AM
nosreme nosreme is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sbeatty1983 View Post
way over priced considering you could find a nice 27-2 for a few bucks more.
Not in this area, and not for one in really good condition. And a 27-2 here for that price would be a steal.
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  #5  
Old 05-25-2012, 07:53 AM
sbeatty1983 sbeatty1983 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nosreme View Post
Not in this area, and not for one in really good condition. And a 27-2 here for that price would be a steal.
Yeah unfortunately i had to pass up a nice 5" blued 27-2 at a gunshow a couple months ago. They wanted 650 but i just didnt have the extra cash at that time.
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  #6  
Old 05-25-2012, 08:02 AM
Kamerer Kamerer is offline
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I could maybe see paying $600 for that in a back alley in NYC for the gun, but anywhere else that's too much for a poorly maintained gun. Too much even for a minty one unless it were ANIB.

I think a 4" 686/586 is about the most perfect .357 magnum for the money, so I encourage you to find another.
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  #7  
Old 05-25-2012, 04:28 PM
BYJO4 BYJO4 is offline
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I also think it is over priced. You might want to look at Gunbroker. The 686 is also an option which I prefer.
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  #8  
Old 05-25-2012, 05:17 PM
Jason D Jason D is offline
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Way to much for a rusted gun.

I paid 399 for my LNIB 4" 586 just two years back.
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  #9  
Old 05-26-2012, 12:40 AM
Snapping Twig Snapping Twig is offline
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If the rust isn't deep, you could use it to your advantage to drop the price.

586's are not as available as 686's.

I sold a 4" 686 to get a 4" 586 which IMO is the better revolver, but that's a subjective interpretation based on my preference for blued guns.
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  #10  
Old 05-28-2012, 06:11 AM
tgun45 tgun45 is offline
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S&W has re-introduced the 586. I saw a 4" one a couple of weeks ago. It looked great, except for the annoying trigger lock on the frame. It was priced at $699.00, at LGS. I was tempted, but I hate that damn lock. Other than that the finish was superb and I liked the wood stocks on it.
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  #11  
Old 05-28-2012, 09:19 AM
SonnyCrockett SonnyCrockett is offline
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looking for a sweet S&W 357......pick u up a used
19 or 66.......even a low dash 686 most can be found for about 500 bucks

600 for that used 586 was a rip
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  #12  
Old 05-28-2012, 01:17 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is offline
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Like this poster said.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SonnyCrockett View Post
looking for a sweet S&W 357......pick u up a used
19 or 66.......even a low dash 686 most can be found for about 500 bucks

600 for that used 586 was a rip
Walk away from that one. They are trying to rip you off.
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  #13  
Old 05-28-2012, 01:42 PM
hi-powered hi-powered is offline
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Blue steel

I like you taste in blue steel (586 fan here), but I would avoid the impulse buy and shop a little further/harder/longer. Good luck in negotiation with the pawn shop.
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  #14  
Old 06-05-2012, 09:55 AM
mac266 mac266 is offline
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Ummm....I'm surprised no one has noticed this. S&W has NEVER and doesn't currently use a transfer bar. Ruger, Colt, and Taurus do, but S&W uses a "hammer block" safety rather than a transfer bar. I can just about guarantee that 586 has a hammer block, too.

Do this test:

1- Check to make sure all the chambers are empty.

2- Close the cylinder and note the position of the hammer.

3- Dry fire once and keep the trigger held back. You should see the hammer is set more deeply into the frame than before you pulled the trigger. If you look through the frame from one side you should also see the firing pin protruding from the frame into the top chamber (in other words, the firing pin would have struck a primer had a round been there).

4- Watch the hammer as you let go of they cylinder. It should move backwards slightly, and looking through the frame in the same spot as previously you'll notice the firing pin is no longer visible.

If all this occurs (and I can guarantee it will, since the 586 has always used the hammer block), the gun is equipped with a hammer block safety. Rather than the transfer bar you referred to that leaves a gap between the hammer and firing pin, the firing pin is ON the hammer. The hammer block is an internal piece that prevents (i.e. "blocks") the hammer from going all the way forward unless you pull the trigger.
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  #15  
Old 06-05-2012, 10:05 AM
sbeatty1983 sbeatty1983 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mac266 View Post
Ummm....I'm surprised no one has noticed this. S&W has NEVER and doesn't currently use a transfer bar. Ruger, Colt, and Taurus do, but S&W uses a "hammer block" safety rather than a transfer bar. I can just about guarantee that 586 has a hammer block, too.

Do this test:

1- Check to make sure all the chambers are empty.

2- Close the cylinder and note the position of the hammer.

3- Dry fire once and keep the trigger held back. You should see the hammer is set more deeply into the frame than before you pulled the trigger. If you look through the frame from one side you should also see the firing pin protruding from the frame into the top chamber (in other words, the firing pin would have struck a primer had a round been there).

4- Watch the hammer as you let go of they cylinder. It should move backwards slightly, and looking through the frame in the same spot as previously you'll notice the firing pin is no longer visible.

If all this occurs (and I can guarantee it will, since the 586 has always used the hammer block), the gun is equipped with a hammer block safety. Rather than the transfer bar you referred to that leaves a gap between the hammer and firing pin, the firing pin is ON the hammer. The hammer block is an internal piece that prevents (i.e. "blocks") the hammer from going all the way forward unless you pull the trigger.
Smith and wessons no longer have the firing pin on the hammer.
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  #16  
Old 06-10-2012, 11:28 PM
DCW DCW is offline
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Sorry I haven't had time to write on here recently. Sbeatty, after you mentioned the 27, I started looking at them. Can anybody vouch for the accuracy of a 4in barrel? I've never dealt with one as my revolvers are all 6in or better. Thanks.
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  #17  
Old 06-11-2012, 01:21 PM
USMM guy USMM guy is offline
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I have never had a model 27.

However I do have three model 28s. They are essentially the same gun. All three of mine are tack drivers. If you get a model 27 that does not shoot well. Then it has likely been abused or severely neglected at some point. They are generally excllent shooters.
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  #18  
Old 06-11-2012, 01:33 PM
Obsessed Obsessed is offline
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Just spoke with a gun buddy this morning..and he was anxious to show off his new revolver that he just bought last friday. It was a 4" S&W 686 stainless that he bought from a local Bay area dealer for only $695...plus tax! BRAND NEW! Think new! It ain't worth the pitifully small amount of dollars saved to deal with issues on a pawn shop gun!
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  #19  
Old 06-11-2012, 05:47 PM
Jason D Jason D is offline
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It seems crazy the amount those have went up over the years.
My 686 was 399.00 brand new back in 1999.
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  #20  
Old 06-11-2012, 06:58 PM
submoa submoa is offline
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The 586 are less common than the 686...consequently are priced higher. Though $600 is way high for a rusted 586.
Paid $500 COTD for this 586 No-Dash ANIB this past weekend:
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