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  #26  
Old 04-28-2012, 07:40 PM
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AndyC AndyC is online now
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My wife told me that she used to babysit Alan in... Malaysia or someplace... when she was a teen
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  #27  
Old 04-29-2012, 03:17 PM
cw_mi cw_mi is online now
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Originally Posted by AndyC View Post
My wife told me that she used to babysit Alan in... Malaysia or someplace... when she was a teen
Seriously ? That's kind of cool. Have you checked out his website ? He's a very talented person. Custom knives, pens and watches.
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  #28  
Old 05-01-2012, 10:06 PM
Mrbigg214 Mrbigg214 is offline
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Yeah his pens and knives are gorgeous. wish I had $650 for a pen lol
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  #29  
Old 05-02-2012, 03:30 PM
LSCG LSCG is offline
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This is mine it might not be what you're looking for but I couldn't help to add it to my collection.
[IMG][/IMG]

very beautiful, what brand is it.?
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  #30  
Old 05-02-2012, 03:45 PM
Mike_Dee Mike_Dee is offline
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Wow! I must live a sheltered life. I've never seen Damascus steel. I'm in lust.
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  #31  
Old 05-02-2012, 03:50 PM
sechott sechott is offline
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This is mine it might not be what you're looking for but I couldn't help to add it to my collection.
[IMG][/IMG]
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I should give more info, it is made by Santa-Fe Stone Works. The handle is mammoth ivory the blade is Japanese, it is only a 3" novelty but extremely sharp.
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very beautiful, what brand is it.?
Thanks, you should see my Chris Peterson knife thread I just got it today.
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  #32  
Old 05-11-2012, 08:02 PM
justjed justjed is offline
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Mike Dee, you STILL haven't seen true Damascus steel! What we have here is pattern-welded steel. Also known as folded steel, or watered steel, it is layers of high-carbon and low-to-medium carbon steel, heated to a critical temperature, and hammered together, welding the individual layers. (Please bear in mind that this is the very simplest of explanations for the process, there are many methods and materials that can be used.) It's beautiful, no doubt, and a very tough blade material when done right. Pattern welded steel was once quite common as a way to use up leftover pieces of steel from other metalworking projects, but died out as the blacksmith was replaced by the blast furnace. This is also the type of steel that the Japanese used to produce the very finest of swords for the Samurai. Knife-maker Bill Moran rediscovered the secret of pattern welded steel in the early 1970s, for which we all owe a debt of gratitude!

TRUE Damascus steel, on the other hand, is more properly called wootz, and is produced in a similar manner to the crucible(powdered metal) steels. Raw iron powder is placed in a clay pot, along with charcoal dust, and a little bit of paper or sawdust. The pot is sealed, and placed in a kiln, or a very hot fire. As the pot heats up, the paper ignites, using up all of the free oxygen, and allowing the iron to melt and absorb the carbon from the charcoal. When the pot finally cools, the pot is broken, the steel ingot is removed and cleaned up, the forging can now begin. Unlike folded steel, there are no visible layers, the pattern you see is just on the surface, and is similar to that of a polished meteorite slice. It is a rare and unique material, quite expensive, but wootz is the steel brought back to Europe by the Crusaders. Since the center of the middle eastern civilization was the city of Damascus, the legendary blades were simply called Damascus steel. If I remember correctly, knife-maker Al Pendray was the first to produce wootz in the US, and probably the first man in the last 200 years to do so outside of a few unknown metalworkers living in the middle east.

There you have it, in 2 paragraphs, you now you know more about Damascus steel than 99.9% of the six and a half billion people on this planet. No joke.
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  #33  
Old 05-12-2012, 11:39 PM
jwise jwise is online now
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  #34  
Old 05-14-2012, 07:17 AM
cw_mi cw_mi is online now
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Originally Posted by justjed View Post
Mike Dee, you STILL haven't seen true Damascus steel! What we have here is pattern-welded steel. Also known as folded steel, or watered steel, it is layers of high-carbon and low-to-medium carbon steel, heated to a critical temperature, and hammered together, welding the individual layers. (Please bear in mind that this is the very simplest of explanations for the process, there are many methods and materials that can be used.) It's beautiful, no doubt, and a very tough blade material when done right. Pattern welded steel was once quite common as a way to use up leftover pieces of steel from other metalworking projects, but died out as the blacksmith was replaced by the blast furnace. This is also the type of steel that the Japanese used to produce the very finest of swords for the Samurai. Knife-maker Bill Moran rediscovered the secret of pattern welded steel in the early 1970s, for which we all owe a debt of gratitude!

TRUE Damascus steel, on the other hand, is more properly called wootz, and is produced in a similar manner to the crucible(powdered metal) steels. Raw iron powder is placed in a clay pot, along with charcoal dust, and a little bit of paper or sawdust. The pot is sealed, and placed in a kiln, or a very hot fire. As the pot heats up, the paper ignites, using up all of the free oxygen, and allowing the iron to melt and absorb the carbon from the charcoal. When the pot finally cools, the pot is broken, the steel ingot is removed and cleaned up, the forging can now begin. Unlike folded steel, there are no visible layers, the pattern you see is just on the surface, and is similar to that of a polished meteorite slice. It is a rare and unique material, quite expensive, but wootz is the steel brought back to Europe by the Crusaders. Since the center of the middle eastern civilization was the city of Damascus, the legendary blades were simply called Damascus steel. If I remember correctly, knife-maker Al Pendray was the first to produce wootz in the US, and probably the first man in the last 200 years to do so outside of a few unknown metalworkers living in the middle east.

There you have it, in 2 paragraphs, you now you know more about Damascus steel than 99.9% of the six and a half billion people on this planet. No joke.
Thanks for sharing that. It was very informative.
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  #35  
Old 05-22-2012, 02:03 PM
jphight jphight is offline
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Check on gun broker. i bought 3 damascus from willscustomdamascusknives. They were fixed blade but he does folders. I was really satified with mine. great guy to do business with. About 100 a piece. I've had mine a couple years.
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