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  #1  
Old 04-15-2012, 09:37 AM
acossey acossey is offline
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Nickel plated 1911 made in 1918 value




My neighbor wants to sell this 1911. Now I know that the nickel plating really screws up the value. The gun most likely has no collector value and would only be a shooter. He has four magazines and the nifty little wooden box he made. I'm thinking of offering 300-350 thinking the true value may be about 500. the serial number is 470xxx rifleing is pretty worn out. Any thoughts and help would be greatly appreciated.






Last edited by dsk; 04-15-2012 at 11:41 AM. Reason: formatting
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  #2  
Old 04-15-2012, 10:12 AM
rox15636215 rox15636215 is offline
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Prob. worth 500.
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  #3  
Old 04-15-2012, 10:34 AM
38 Super +p 38 Super +p is offline
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I'd give $300 for it. It'd make a sweet BBQ gun
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  #4  
Old 04-15-2012, 10:40 AM
acossey acossey is offline
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I have seen the term BBQ gun but I don't know what that means.
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  #5  
Old 04-15-2012, 10:41 AM
acossey acossey is offline
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By the way is this nickel or chrome?
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  #6  
Old 04-15-2012, 10:50 AM
CIB CIB is offline
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I would imagine it is nickle.
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  #7  
Old 04-15-2012, 11:44 AM
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Some folks might give $600-$700 for it. Fortunately it doesn't appear to have been buffed to death, and it might be semi-restorable if given to a competent refinisher.

"BBQ gun" is a cute name for guns that are often taken out of the safe only to show off to friends and neighbors at a barbeque gathering.
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Try not to fall into the common trap of wanting to replace everything on your new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out, and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot it for at least 500 rounds, then decide what you don't like and want improved. Vintage 1911's should NEVER be refinished or modified because it ruins any value they had as a collectible firearm.
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  #8  
Old 04-15-2012, 12:01 PM
acossey acossey is offline
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Why the nickel plate

So why did they nickel plate these. I would guess that there was a bunch of worn out leftover guns that got prettied up after the war.
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  #9  
Old 04-15-2012, 12:23 PM
CIB CIB is offline
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Back in the day people did not consider these collectible so they prettied up or modified them in all manner of ways. After each World War and especially WWII these were all over the places when GI's brought them home. My Dad told me you could get a 1911 or Luger for $10-$15. Also, the DCM sold them for a realtively low price and people bought them and did all kinds of things to them to personalize them.
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  #10  
Old 04-15-2012, 12:24 PM
Jack71 Jack71 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acossey View Post
So why did they nickel plate these. I would guess that there was a bunch of worn out leftover guns that got prettied up after the war.
Not necessarily. I recall when a nickel plated gun was considered by many to be the height of fashion. While some might have been in poor condition, many were in good shape with nearly all their original finish.

I remember about 35 years ago a WWII veteran who proudly showed me the Luger he brought back from Germany and had nickel plated after he got home. Like CIB said, they just weren't seen as being valuable in their original condition.

Last edited by Jack71; 04-15-2012 at 12:27 PM.
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  #11  
Old 04-15-2012, 02:19 PM
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Nickel plating was hugely popular in the 1960's and 1970's, just like Ninja Black and OD Green is today.
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Try not to fall into the common trap of wanting to replace everything on your new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out, and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot it for at least 500 rounds, then decide what you don't like and want improved. Vintage 1911's should NEVER be refinished or modified because it ruins any value they had as a collectible firearm.
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  #12  
Old 04-15-2012, 03:53 PM
38 Super +p 38 Super +p is offline
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I'd say leave it like it is.
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  #13  
Old 04-15-2012, 04:12 PM
Burgs Burgs is offline
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I like it. It isn't a collector piece, but it's a cool shooter.
An example of post war G.I. history maybe.
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  #14  
Old 04-15-2012, 04:32 PM
CIB CIB is offline
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I like it. It isn't a collector piece, but it's a cool shooter.
An example of post war G.I. history maybe.
I would be careful shooting one of these old ones.
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  #15  
Old 04-15-2012, 05:57 PM
CJS57 CJS57 is offline
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I like it! Could get at least $800 on Gunbroker. The grips are $250 alone.
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  #16  
Old 04-15-2012, 06:41 PM
DPris DPris is offline
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I'd buy the box & leave the Colt behind.
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  #17  
Old 04-16-2012, 09:12 AM
heckinohio heckinohio is offline
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Chrome/nickle/engraved .45's took a big increase in populatrity after the first showing of the 'Titanic' movie several years ago. Suspect this will happen again when several folks go to see the remake in 3D. PJH
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  #18  
Old 04-16-2012, 09:47 AM
berghi51 berghi51 is offline
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Is it true than nickeled or chromed weapons needs less of care than blued finished ?
I saw in books than nickeled SAA were issued to native scouts and soldiers for this reason in the end of 19th century.
Before stainless steel, perhaps it was a good finish for rough service guns like motorbike patrolmen for example (in France, they were issued stainless revolver before "plastic pistols).
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  #19  
Old 04-16-2012, 12:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heckinohio View Post
Chrome/nickle/engraved .45's took a big increase in populatrity after the first showing of the 'Titanic' movie several years ago. Suspect this will happen again when several folks go to see the remake in 3D. PJH
And if you meet somebody who talks about doing it I hope you slap them silly.
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Try not to fall into the common trap of wanting to replace everything on your new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out, and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot it for at least 500 rounds, then decide what you don't like and want improved. Vintage 1911's should NEVER be refinished or modified because it ruins any value they had as a collectible firearm.
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  #20  
Old 04-16-2012, 02:42 PM
1saxman 1saxman is offline
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It is not impossible that a 1911 could have been on the Titanic, but its not likely. Production had just started, and distribution was very slow in those days. The first 50 pistols were shipped to Springfield Armory in Jan.
Sailing was the only way to get to England, and the ship left from there. Somebody would have had to make a special order from Colt to have a Government Model engraved and plated. That is going to take some time when Colt is busy with the first order for the military. Then, the pistol had to be carried to England by sea, the owner presumably planning on a stay, not leaving one ship and getting right on the Titanic to return to America.
Now, there were some very influential people on that ship, and money talks. That's why I'm leaving open the possibility that it got done.
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  #21  
Old 04-16-2012, 06:00 PM
38 Super +p 38 Super +p is offline
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I kinda think nickel 1911s look cool, wouldn't do it to a vintage 1911, though.
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  #22  
Old 04-16-2012, 06:47 PM
WiseguyThreeOne WiseguyThreeOne is offline
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I paid $350 for a good nickel-plated USGI in 2002, so I'd imagine the price has gone up a little. Many good plated guns are restoration candidates, and many already have been judging from the "pristine all-original" ones I see up for online bids.
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  #23  
Old 04-16-2012, 07:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1saxman View Post
It is not impossible that a 1911 could have been on the Titanic, but its not likely. Production had just started, and distribution was very slow in those days. The first 50 pistols were shipped to Springfield Armory in Jan.
Sailing was the only way to get to England, and the ship left from there. Somebody would have had to make a special order from Colt to have a Government Model engraved and plated. That is going to take some time when Colt is busy with the first order for the military. Then, the pistol had to be carried to England by sea, the owner presumably planning on a stay, not leaving one ship and getting right on the Titanic to return to America.
Now, there were some very influential people on that ship, and money talks. That's why I'm leaving open the possibility that it got done.
When the movie first came out in 1997 a lot of folks on gun boards (which were quite primitive at the time) were saying "no way!". Apparently the debate reached the ears of somebody involved with the actual movie, who replied that they wanted the sinister bodyguard character (Mr. Lovejoy) to have a large conspicuous sidearm, and a fancy nickeled and engraved 1911 fit the bill. In reply to the assertions that a 1911 could not have been on the Titanic, it was noted that Billy Zane's character was an extremely rich and influential person who pulled strings and made "business propositions" a part of daily routine. As a result he probably had enough influence with somebody at Colt that a pre-production 1911 was assembled, fancied up, and given to him or his bodyguard as a gift prior to his traveling to Europe to go pick up Rose and her family. Maybe not likely in the real world, but according to the movie Billy Zane's character got whatever he wanted, whenever he wanted it, which was of course a huge part of the plot given the fact that the only thing he couldn't have was Rose's affection.

Besides that, seeing a 1911 made the movie more palatable to me. It also allowed me to fit in with all the sobbing people in the theater, with nobody realizing I was actually crying for a nice 1911 that was on its way to the bottom.
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Try not to fall into the common trap of wanting to replace everything on your new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out, and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot it for at least 500 rounds, then decide what you don't like and want improved. Vintage 1911's should NEVER be refinished or modified because it ruins any value they had as a collectible firearm.

Last edited by dsk; 04-16-2012 at 07:20 PM.
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  #24  
Old 04-17-2012, 10:22 PM
acossey acossey is offline
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very funny stuff guys. Thanks for the input.
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  #25  
Old 04-18-2012, 10:31 AM
Malysh Malysh is offline
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I read in either an S&W or Colt research book that in the 1800s factory nickel guns outsold blued guns. By the turn of the 20th century, it was changing to the opposite.
I cannot tell you whether this is true or not but whomever wrote the book I am thinking of had to have more expertise than I do.
This has nothing to do with the popularity of getting WWII souvenir guns plated, it's just a comment on the basic subject.
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