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  #1  
Old 12-07-2009, 09:57 PM
BOOTY BOOTY is offline
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What is the best way to line up your sights?




Hey Guys,
I am new with the 1911. I have a SA Loaded. What is the best way to line up the sights? Looked in my manuel and i didnt under stand the 6 oclock way to aim. Can somebody fill me in on some tricks?

Last edited by BOOTY; 12-07-2009 at 10:15 PM.
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  #2  
Old 12-07-2009, 10:16 PM
old-lefty old-lefty is offline
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WELCOME TO THE WORLD OF 1911 PISTOLS - Hope you have lots of will power - cause you have a "starter kit" - there will be more and more!!!!

well for me - keep your focus on the front sight and the target.
The 6 oclock is POA - point of aim at the 6 oclock point on the target. So put that white dot at 6 - alight the two back whites and squeez the trigger.

go to you tube and look for todd jarrett videos on grip stance and aim.
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  #3  
Old 12-07-2009, 11:30 PM
scottl scottl is offline
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1)6 o'clock hold
2)Point of Aim / Point of Impact
3)Behind front dot
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  #4  
Old 12-07-2009, 11:32 PM
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RickB RickB is offline
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I find any sort of dots or bars confusing. I get the best results by removing the dots from the rear sight, which is what I did with my Mil-Spec, which results in a prominent front sight, where your focus should be anyway, without the busy appearance of multiple dots. Sights are always aligned the same way, with the front sight centered in the notch, and the top of the front even with the top of the rear. As noted above, "6:00" is a form of sight picture, with the target sitting on top of the sights, regardless of the target's size. It's useful only on targets of known size at known distances, so it's great for bullseye shooting and not much else. For more "practical" applications, such as rolling tin cans, or shooting gnat off a fly, you use a point of aim that corresponds to the desired point of impact. At typical handgun ranges, you won't have to be concerned with bullet drop or wind, so the sights can be adjusted for dead-on at 25 yards, or even 25 feet, and you'll be fine for most shooting situations.
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  #5  
Old 12-07-2009, 11:41 PM
mark2734 mark2734 is offline
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Like others have said ignore the dots unless your shooting at close range and quickly.

For precise shoot placement the standard is focus on the front sight, rear and target both blurry, front sight even across the top with the rear, front sight centered in the rear notch.

The 6:00 hold is for aiming at the bottom, or 6:00 position, of a round bullseye target. The rounds strike dead center of the bullseye. Like RickB pointed out this only works for a predetermined distance with predetermined ammo and a predetermined bullseye target, like NRA Slow Fire.

For quick shooting a lot of shooters have switched to some sort of bead/fiber optic/gold dot/whatever in the front and a plain black rear.

Hope this helps.
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  #6  
Old 12-08-2009, 11:19 AM
BOOTY BOOTY is offline
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Thank you guys. I will study all of this and try to check out some videos. I still don't really understand the 6:00 position. It seems like it would shoot way low. I will look at some videos when i get off work and try to figure it out.
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  #7  
Old 12-08-2009, 11:30 AM
RandyP RandyP is offline
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IF you hold a 6:00 sight picture and your round shoots to THAT point of aim, then you will hit the target at the 6:00. What is being stated is that at a fixed distance, say 25 yards, but more importantly just a fixed distance and a fixed target height, you are actually sending the bullet on an arc 'above' the sight picture.

The thing that gets most folks shooting all over the target is not remembering to focus ONLY on the front sight. The human eye can only clearly focus on one distance at a time, the rest you see will be blurry. We have adapted to make the change so quickly that our brain almost does not register that blurriness when we look at the world around us. The exception is target shooting. Unless you use optics, just focus on the front sight and squeeze the trigger.

IMHO
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  #8  
Old 12-08-2009, 12:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BOOTY View Post
Thank you guys. I will study all of this and try to check out some videos. I still don't really understand the 6:00 position. It seems like it would shoot way low. I will look at some videos when i get off work and try to figure it out.
If your bull is 6" in diameter, and you want to use a 6:00 hold at 25 yards, you must adjust your sights so the gun hits 3" above point of aim at 25 yards (so the bullet hits the center of the bull, even though the sights are aligned with the bottom of the bull). If it's an 8" bull at 50 yards, you must adjust your sights so the gun hits 4" high at 50. That's why I say it's only useful for targets of known size at known distances, as the gun must have the sights adjusted in advance for those known conditions. Fixed sights are generally set for a sort of catch-all combination of load/target/distance; for a .45, that could be dead-on at 25 yards with a 230 gr @ 850fps load. Of course, the gun won't hit to exactly the same point for any two people, or loads at the opposite ends of the spectrum, and that's the attraction of adjustable sights.
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  #9  
Old 12-08-2009, 12:27 PM
Kamau Kamau is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by old-lefty View Post
WELCOME TO THE WORLD OF 1911 PISTOLS - Hope you have lots of will power - cause you have a "starter kit" - there will be more and more!!!!

well for me - keep your focus on the front sight and the target.
The 6 oclock is POA - point of aim at the 6 oclock point on the target. So put that white dot at 6 - alight the two back whites and squeez the trigger.

go to you tube and look for todd jarrett videos on grip stance and aim.
I have to disagree with you Old Lefty. If he focuses on the target and rear sights his sight picture will move ever so slightly. The key is, as others have said, to focus on the front sight. His eyes will naturally center the front sight tip.

Or, what I do, I stare at the front sight and when I see a equal amount of white (daylight) on each sides of the sight I know I'm centered. That's when I "push the bullet" as Steven Segal says.
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  #10  
Old 12-09-2009, 04:23 PM
NonPCnraRN NonPCnraRN is offline
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The 6 o'clock hold is used for target shooting as most target sights are black and the bullseye is black. You can use a center point of aim which means that you are lining up the sights on the center of the bullseye. The trouble is that it is less precise because you have black sights on a black backround. With a 6 o'clock hold you line up the sights with the black circle of the bullseye centered on top of the front sight. Most shooters leave a tiny sliver of white between the top of the post and the bottom of the bullseye for a more precise and consistent sight picture. With the center hold it is harder to precisely put the aligned sight picture in the exact center, essentially cutting the bullseye in half. Only the top half of the bullseye shows above the sights and is a less consistent way of aiming for target shooting. So you aim at the bottom of the circle leaving a small sliver of white showing and you adjust the sights to hit in the center of the bull. For a self defense gun you don't want bullets hitting 3-4 inches above the point of aim. You want the bullet to go where the white dot on the front sight is placed on the target. With fixed sights I would just place the dot of the front sight where you want it to hit and see where that impact is at various ranges from say point blank out to 25yds. I would be most interested in the point blank and 7-15 yds impact points (21 to 45 feet) as anything past that and you will have some 'splaining to do if you are shooting at someone that far away and calling it self defense. According to the FBI, the average distance for LEO / bad guy shootings take place at about 7 yds. Line up the sights, place the front sight dot where you want the bullet to go and pull the trigger. As others have said you can't focus on three points at once so for the best accuracy the rear sights and the target will be a little fuzzy because you are focusing on the front sight. I took a black permanet marker to the dots on my rear sight and just left the dot on the front sight alone. I want my eyes to instinctively focus on the white dot of the front sight. If aiming at someone's head I would hate to have the bullet flying over the top of it because I forgot I sighted my gun in with a 6 o'clock hold with the bullets hitting 4" above the point of aim. Hope this helps.
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  #11  
Old 12-09-2009, 05:24 PM
BOOTY BOOTY is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NonPCnraRN View Post
The 6 o'clock hold is used for target shooting as most target sights are black and the bullseye is black. You can use a center point of aim which means that you are lining up the sights on the center of the bullseye. The trouble is that it is less precise because you have black sights on a black backround. With a 6 o'clock hold you line up the sights with the black circle of the bullseye centered on top of the front sight. Most shooters leave a tiny sliver of white between the top of the post and the bottom of the bullseye for a more precise and consistent sight picture. With the center hold it is harder to precisely put the aligned sight picture in the exact center, essentially cutting the bullseye in half. Only the top half of the bullseye shows above the sights and is a less consistent way of aiming for target shooting. So you aim at the bottom of the circle leaving a small sliver of white showing and you adjust the sights to hit in the center of the bull. For a self defense gun you don't want bullets hitting 3-4 inches above the point of aim. You want the bullet to go where the white dot on the front sight is placed on the target. With fixed sights I would just place the dot of the front sight where you want it to hit and see where that impact is at various ranges from say point blank out to 25yds. I would be most interested in the point blank and 7-15 yds impact points (21 to 45 feet) as anything past that and you will have some 'splaining to do if you are shooting at someone that far away and calling it self defense. According to the FBI, the average distance for LEO / bad guy shootings take place at about 7 yds. Line up the sights, place the front sight dot where you want the bullet to go and pull the trigger. As others have said you can't focus on three points at once so for the best accuracy the rear sights and the target will be a little fuzzy because you are focusing on the front sight. I took a black permanet marker to the dots on my rear sight and just left the dot on the front sight alone. I want my eyes to instinctively focus on the white dot of the front sight. If aiming at someone's head I would hate to have the bullet flying over the top of it because I forgot I sighted my gun in with a 6 o'clock hold with the bullets hitting 4" above the point of aim. Hope this helps.
You have explained it perfect. Thank you. that helps. Between this answer and all the other answers i will figure it out. I will shoot a couple hundred rounds this week end and see where i end up. I will let you know how i do. Thanks again,
Booty
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  #12  
Old 12-09-2009, 10:55 PM
mark2734 mark2734 is offline
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Don't try to reinvent the wheel. Using the DOT to aim is bad. Period. The dot is for quick and dirty close range use only.

For really hitting what your aiming at use JUST the outline of the front sight. Your point of aim/point of impact (POA/POI) should be at the exact top center of the front sight, NOT the middle of the blade where the dot is.

Precision bullseye shooters, the kind that win international gold medals, use plain black sights with no dots/bars/stripes/whatever.

Last edited by mark2734; 12-10-2009 at 10:12 AM.
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  #13  
Old 12-10-2009, 12:42 AM
NonPCnraRN NonPCnraRN is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mark2734 View Post
Don't try to reinvent the wheel. Using the DOT to aim is bad. Period. The dot is for quick and dirty close range use only.

For really hitting what your aiming at use JUST the outline of the front sight. Your point of aim/point of impact (POA/POI) should be at the exact top center of the front sight, NOT the middle of the blade where the dot is.

Precision bullseye shooters, the kind that win international gold medals, use plain black sights with not dots/bars/stripes/whatever.
That is why I explained the difference between the 6 o'clock hold and the center aim. You are correct. Using the top of the front sight in relation to the rear sight and target is the most precise way to aim. However, my Milspec is for close encounters of the ugly kind and placing the dot on the target where I want the bullet to go is what I will do in a SHTF situation. In reality the range will determine where the bullet hits and I worry more about windage being correct than the elevation. Learn where the bullet hits at likely combat ranges and practice, practice, practice. If someone is holding a knife to my wife's throat he will suffer severe cerebral trauma induced by a 230 gr projectile. You have to know where the point of impact is in relation to point of aim at point blank to 7 yd distance and beyond to a max of 25 yds, which as I said before is a distance that would make arguing self defense difficult. If you are shooting for center mass, then a white dot shows up against a dark backround better than a black front sight. If the gun is for SD in the home then I would measure the longest distance that would be encountered which is usually a hallway, and practice accordingly. For concealed carry I would still practice at various distances from bellybutton to 25 yds to be sure where my rounds will land on the target.
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  #14  
Old 12-10-2009, 04:04 PM
BOOTY BOOTY is offline
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This is great information. You guys are awesome!!!!
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  #15  
Old 12-10-2009, 04:22 PM
Toml Toml is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mark2734 View Post
Don't try to reinvent the wheel. Using the DOT to aim is bad. Period. The dot is for quick and dirty close range use only.

For really hitting what your aiming at use JUST the outline of the front sight. Your point of aim/point of impact (POA/POI) should be at the exact top center of the front sight, NOT the middle of the blade where the dot is.

Precision bullseye shooters, the kind that win international gold medals, use plain black sights with no dots/bars/stripes/whatever.
Unless the gun's sights are regulated to that point, as the H&K P7's are.
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