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  #1  
Old 04-19-2009, 05:11 PM
diowk diowk is offline
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are all 1911 parts interchangable?




So I want to change the stainless grip safety, thumb safety, and slide stop on my soon-to-purchase dan wesson pm7 for black ones because I like the contrast. (similar to the SS SW1911) I cant find any specific dan wesson parts like this but could I put other brands like kimber safeties on my DW? or other brands? they all look identical. If not does anyone know where to buy these parts for a DW in black and not stainless?
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  #2  
Old 04-19-2009, 05:13 PM
diesel79 diesel79 is offline
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You can use whom evers parts you want. They will 99.9% of the time have to be fitted. Some are easier to fit than others as well. I leave all of that kind of stuff up to a competent smith. Some parts are significantly better than others as well.
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Last edited by diesel79; 04-19-2009 at 05:24 PM.
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  #3  
Old 04-19-2009, 05:25 PM
diowk diowk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diesel79 View Post
You can use whom evers parts you want. They will 99.9% of the time have to be fitted. Some parts are significantly better than others as well.
what do you mean by fitted? is anything permanent done to the gun when new parts are fitted to it? and whos parts would you recommend for this?
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  #4  
Old 04-19-2009, 05:29 PM
parallax parallax is offline
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All parts need to be fitted to the specific gun they will be installed on!

The grip safety comes in several differnet radius, most commonly .250 and .220. The Dan Wesson uses Ed Brown parts, so it would be a .250 radius.

The slide stop will probably be a drop-in.

The thumb safety MUST be fitted to insure proper function and safety!

If you are not experienced doing this, you should take it to a gunsmith.
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  #5  
Old 04-20-2009, 12:01 AM
Kamerer Kamerer is offline
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I agree with Parallax. If they are originally Ed Brown parts, then Ed Brown parts should fit well. The slide stop and grip safety will likely drop-in.

The thumb safety may, but if it doesn't you can fit it yourself w/o too much trouble. You can search here for instructions on that. It just takes a file and going carefully and slowly.

Some 'smiths will fit these parts for you if you buy from them - ask around.
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  #6  
Old 04-20-2009, 08:28 AM
Bill Ng Bill Ng is offline
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The short answer is no .. you cannot just drop any old part in. Not because the parts are designed differently from each manufacturer, but because the parts are made oversized so that they can be filed/sanded down to a perfect/precise fit on each individual gun.

No, you cannot just buy a grip-safety and install it into your gun, it doesn't work that way.
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  #7  
Old 04-20-2009, 01:04 PM
brickeyee brickeyee is offline
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Quote:
The slide stop and grip safety will likely drop-in.
Slide stop maybe, grip safety less likely.

The arm that stops the trigger from moving is often left long and must be fitted to the frame.

A drop in thumb safety is extremely rare. Fitting to ensure correct contact withthe sear is generally a given.

Last edited by brickeyee; 04-20-2009 at 02:43 PM.
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  #8  
Old 04-20-2009, 02:29 PM
Randall M Randall M is offline
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Since I modified in a similar fashion my S&W 1911, I'll
chime on in for diowk.

My S&W 1911 5" Bbl. Stainless Steel with fixed
sights came with an arched Main Spring Housing
(MSH). Problem was besides being an abomination
since it was blah polymer it was also
checkered with large enough checkering (20 LPI?)
that it dug into the heel of my hand. so, I go
shopping, at Brownells. Brownells stocks 10 or more
different make/style/purpose MSHs. i chose an
MSH made by Les Baer - It's a similar matte finish
in stainless steel, with vertical serration - sticks out
so it isn't flush like a flat MSH. I also got the
Wilson Combat extended slide release in SS, as well
as Rosewood grips from Hogiues. I gave it all to my gunmith for
fitting - it included making sure the bottom of the grip safety has
clearance, he said he also polishes the inside of
the raw MSH so the main spring has freedom of movement.
the Gunny also siad the slide pin took a slight hone and he relieved
the LH side grip at the front for clearance
for the extended slide release. I've left the
stock blued thumb safety on it for now, it's the
only dark part except for the low mount 'carry'
Novak sights.

Oh, the other thing I had the gunsmith did - same
order for parts from Brownells was a hammer strut
and the Main Spring Cup in Titanium. Lighter
moving parts = quicker iginition time, although it
would have to be measured by scientific methods
than my opinion. Check I bought Ti parts for my
old Ducati roadracer so what the heck tTi is cool.


Total, Les Baer MSH $35?
WS extended slide release, $30
Hogue Rosewood grips $40
To parts were approx. $ 20
Fitting - $ 35
wait, let Jethro sum this uup,
uh.... $ 160

We couldn't figure out at the time about
a replacement TI firing pin. I have
since found out S&W uses a 9mmx19/.38 SUper
sized firing pin - it's unique because there's a notch for the
Firing Pin block - S&W'vs version of the FPS.
If you use a Springfield Armory 9mm/.38 Super sized
FP in Ti on a S&W it disables the FPS but the mechaism
is still there. So now that S&W has come out with a
TI FPS 1911 model I have been waffling
on contacting them to see if I can use or buy one the
S&W TI FPs. I might inclu8de this with a S&W Perf. Center Action Job.

Randall look for a Round Tu It
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  #9  
Old 04-21-2009, 05:48 AM
WESHOOT2 WESHOOT2 is offline
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ah, grasshopper

Quote:
Originally Posted by diowk View Post
what do you mean by fitted? is anything permanent done to the gun when new parts are fitted to it? and whos parts would you recommend for this?
"Fitted" means 'modified metal, made to fit'.

"Permanent", absolutely, as often major parts need modifying to allow small parts to fit.

"Parts" from Caspian, EGW, Ed Brown, Nowlin, and others.

Never-ever expect ANY part to 'fit'; expect it to need work.
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  #10  
Old 04-21-2009, 09:56 AM
brickeyee brickeyee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WESHOOT2 View Post
"Fitted" means 'modified metal, made to fit'.

"Permanent", absolutely, as often major parts need modifying to allow small parts to fit.

"Parts" from Caspian, EGW, Ed Brown, Nowlin, and others.

Never-ever expect ANY part to 'fit'; expect it to need work.
And the general rule it always modify the cheaper part.

Think long and hard about frame changes.
In a 1911 that is legally the gun, and if you mess it up the cost of repairs is very high, especially if you have to throw in shipping.
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  #11  
Old 04-21-2009, 12:27 PM
imightbewrong imightbewrong is offline
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I enjoy the fact that I have to have new parts fitted. Its part of the whole 1911 building experience. There's nothing I like more than buying a basic mil-spec style pistol and deciding what work to have done to it!
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  #12  
Old 04-21-2009, 01:15 PM
AzDave AzDave is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diowk View Post
If not does anyone know where to buy these parts for a DW in black and not stainless?
You will likely have trouble finding black. Blue yes.

One suggestion. Buy good parts, Wilson, Brown, etc. I would avoid Chip McCormack parts. I have bought a few from them over the years, and everyone was junk. Most recent was an extended tactical magazine release that was total junk. Would fit, but was so eccentric that it wouldn't operate properly. I figured no stress part, how could they screw this up. I couldn't get it to work, so I bought a Brown for a few dollars more and worked with no modifications.
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  #13  
Old 04-21-2009, 05:10 PM
TRD8 TRD8 is offline
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I understand that certain parts may require “fitting” if they are not made to “spec” or oversized to begin with. But shouldn’t most of the parts work when moved from one mil spec pistol to another? When the 1911 was first introduced I can understand why this wouldn’t and couldn’t be possible, but with today’s machinery and technology why can’t all the parts be manufactured to fit off the shelf?
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  #14  
Old 04-21-2009, 06:20 PM
DevilDave1911 DevilDave1911 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trd8 View Post
i understand that certain parts may require “fitting” if they are not made to “spec” or oversized to begin with. But shouldn’t most of the parts work when moved from one mil spec pistol to another? When the 1911 was first introduced i can understand why this wouldn’t and couldn’t be possible, but with today’s machinery and technology why can’t all the parts be manufactured to fit off the shelf?

no.
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  #15  
Old 04-21-2009, 11:13 PM
Kamerer Kamerer is offline
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Quote:
No, you cannot just buy a grip-safety and install it into your gun, it doesn't work that way.
Um, is sure does "work that way." You but, then you install it. How else does it get in there?

Sometimes it drops in and works fine, sometimes you need to fit it. But either way, buying one and installing it is how you change the the grip safety (or any other part). This isn't something that requires a fancy machine or esoteric knowledge that only a factory or high-level wizard can provide.
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  #16  
Old 04-22-2009, 08:48 AM
richyoung richyoung is offline
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Why not send your existing parts in to be trated or caoted with a black finish? Ion Bond, NP3, or even Teflon. Heck, parts that small you could do at home in your kitchen oven - AND THEY ARE ALREADY FITTED to your gun. If you decide you don;t like it, just strip off the coating, or polish until they are shiny again.
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  #17  
Old 04-22-2009, 10:37 AM
brickeyee brickeyee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TRD8 View Post
I understand that certain parts may require “fitting” if they are not made to “spec” or oversized to begin with. But shouldn’t most of the parts work when moved from one mil spec pistol to another? When the 1911 was first introduced I can understand why this wouldn’t and couldn’t be possible, but with today’s machinery and technology why can’t all the parts be manufactured to fit off the shelf?
In a production environment parts could be picked over if one did not fit/operate correctly.

That is not going to be a good option anymore.

Purchasing a bucket of parts to make sure you get one that fits/operates is not a cost effective method.

Quote:
...with today’s machinery and technology why can’t all the parts be manufactured to fit off the shelf?
Tolerances and tolerance stack would run the price of the components through the roof, and still leave older guns without the same tolerance setup with a problem.

One of the reasons the 1911 design can be made to have such a good trigger pull is the final fitting performed.
The full cock hook on the hammer is only about 0.020 inches deep.
Add in some tolerances for the hammer pin diameter, sear pin diameter, sear and hammer holes, sear and hammer mounting pin holes in the frame, etc. and 0.020 starts looking pretty small to have a safe and reliable trigger.

Last edited by brickeyee; 04-22-2009 at 10:42 AM.
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