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  #1  
Old 07-30-2006, 07:07 PM
RobertI RobertI is offline
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Considering using Wilson Combat trigger, hammer & sear




Whatís the general consensus on the Wilson trifecta?

337B Skeletonized Ultralight Hammer
190 Ultralight Match Trigger (Long)
314 Deluxe A-2 Sear

Fitting them to the gun is not a problem since I work in a machine shop and have some good people at my disposal. My concern is making them fit each other. According to the Wilson site, all the parts are supposed to be nicely matched to each other. But how true is that?

I did some searches on this site, but didnít get an exact answer. Opinions welcome.
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  #2  
Old 07-30-2006, 07:42 PM
torrejon224 torrejon224 is offline
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Nothing is ever going to "drop in" but since you work in a machine shop your good to go. WIlson Combat makes great products and stand behind them, just don't buy off E-bay as some of the parts are rip offs. Personally I would keep the WC trigger but get an EGW ignition set, do a trigger job and you would have a great 1911 at a cost of probably under $150.
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  #3  
Old 07-30-2006, 07:54 PM
Jim Watson Jim Watson is offline
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I have seen a few machinists find that there was more difference between machinist and gunsmith than they thought. There are not the blueprints to make a pistol work like you think it should.
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  #4  
Old 07-30-2006, 07:59 PM
RobertI RobertI is offline
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Let me rephrase Ė I work in a precision machine shop. Actually that is a small part of what we do. I also have a former jeweler/watch repairman in my employ so Iím pretty sure I can handle anything that may come up. This is also not my first time around working on weaponry, but the warning is noted though.
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  #5  
Old 07-30-2006, 09:27 PM
shane45-1911 shane45-1911 is offline
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I'm still a bit confused. Watchmakers are not gunsmiths. "Precision machine shops" are not gunsmith shops.

None of that means you know how to fit a hammer to a sear, or a sear to a thumb safety.
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  #6  
Old 07-30-2006, 09:40 PM
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RetiredRod RetiredRod is offline
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The Wilson parts that you listed are good parts. You won't go wrong using them. Others may be better, I just don't know. I haven't tried them all. But, I've always been satisfied with Wilson quality parts.

Good shooting.....Rod.
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  #7  
Old 07-30-2006, 09:53 PM
torrejon224 torrejon224 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shane45-1911
I'm still a bit confused. Watchmakers are not gunsmiths. "Precision machine shops" are not gunsmith shops.

None of that means you know how to fit a hammer to a sear, or a sear to a thumb safety.
At least he is willing to give it a shot. Isn't this how we learn by making mistakes? Sounds like he has a pretty good shot at making things right so I think we should at least encourage the guy!
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  #8  
Old 07-30-2006, 10:38 PM
E5MC E5MC is offline
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I've had real good luck with both the C&S TacII set, as well as the Yost/Bonitz set. Both of these set's did actually drop in without any added work. Be sure to run a safety check before trusting any ignition set. YMMV
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  #9  
Old 07-30-2006, 11:35 PM
Gammon Gammon is offline
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I would buy both of Kuhnhausen's books on the .45 and also a quality hammer/sear jig. Marvel makes some great tools, available from Brownells. I have known both machinists and jewellers who have dabbled in gunsmithing; both found they had a lot to learn. There is a lot of very specialized knowledge involved.
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  #10  
Old 07-31-2006, 06:24 AM
shane45-1911 shane45-1911 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by torrejon224
Isn't this how we learn by making mistakes?
I am not trying to discourage any one. I would much prefer when firearms are involved however, that people know what they are doing BEFORE mistakes are made.

This is not a watch he's working on.

The best watchmakers and "precision" toolsmiths don't necessarily know how to add an escape angle to a sear, or what the safety checks of a properly fit 1911 are.

Be safe and ask a lot of questions is my advice. Don't rely on a watchmaker to necessarily make a safe pistol.
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  #11  
Old 07-31-2006, 06:48 AM
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With the instructions and the tooling at hand, (you have the talent) you should be good. Here is a quick outline, (read not complete).

1. Make sure hammer hooks are 90 degrees.
2. Check hook height, .018 - .020
3. stone primary sear angle to match hammer hooks, (parts relationship in cocked position).
4. Relive secondary angle.
5. check thumb safety for safe function.
6. put a one micron finish on all bearing surfaces.
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  #12  
Old 07-31-2006, 07:50 AM
RobertI RobertI is offline
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Thanks to all who offered useful advice. Not quite the warm welcome I was hoping for.

Let me allay some of your fears (Öbut I didnít think I had to. My question was regarding Wilson products, not my gunsmithing ability. If I ever post again, Iíll be careful NOT to say anything about doing it myself to avoid this apparently typical onslaught. ). This particular watchmaker was also a gunsmith in a former life before turning to jewelry, electronics, etc. He and I have worked on several of my ARs as well as most of my pistols. This is not our first time around the block. We know what we are doing.

Now getting back to Wilson productsÖ..

Last edited by RobertI; 07-31-2006 at 07:57 AM.
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  #13  
Old 08-04-2006, 09:35 AM
RobertI RobertI is offline
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I fitted my new Wilson ultralight trigger yesterday evening with great success.

I even beadblasted it so it looks factory.
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  #14  
Old 08-04-2006, 09:55 AM
Dave Berryhill Dave Berryhill is offline
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That Wilson hammer and sear are very good parts. The trigger is also well made but I don't see the need to have a trigger bow with material removed unless you're setting up an really light trigger pull.
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  #15  
Old 08-04-2006, 10:13 AM
RobertI RobertI is offline
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I didnít take anything off the bow. I only beadblasted the aluminum finger pad to remove the marks from fitting it to the frame.
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  #16  
Old 08-04-2006, 11:14 AM
Dave Berryhill Dave Berryhill is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertI
I didnít take anything off the bow....
I was referring to the way it comes from Wilson. IIRC, that trigger has about half of the material removed from the sides of the bow.
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  #17  
Old 08-04-2006, 11:21 AM
RobertI RobertI is offline
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Oh yes I noticed that too. I do plan to use it for IPSC rather than carry so the lighter the pull....
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  #18  
Old 08-04-2006, 11:29 AM
Dave Berryhill Dave Berryhill is offline
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The trigger itself doesn't make the pull lighter.........never mind.
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  #19  
Old 08-04-2006, 11:35 AM
RobertI RobertI is offline
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I know what you were getting at, and yes I am setting it up for a very light trigger pull.
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  #20  
Old 08-04-2006, 11:45 AM
6285108 6285108 is offline
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What did Bill Wilson do for a living before he started building guns????????????????????

DOH!!!!!!!!!!!

Bill Wilson began as a jeweler and watch maker who left his familyís business to open a small gun and sporting goods store. He began tinkering with guns after one of his own choked, sputtered and died it its first shooting match.

ďI thought if I could make tiny parts for something as intricate as a piece of jewelry or a watch, I could certainly build a gun I liked,Ē he says. Fellow shooters admired his work, so Wilson began modifying their 1911-type pistols. He and his wife, Darla, eventually opened Wilsonís Gun Shop, now called Wilson Combat.
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Last edited by 6285108; 08-04-2006 at 11:49 AM.
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  #21  
Old 08-04-2006, 12:07 PM
RobertI RobertI is offline
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Iím no Bill Wilson. Heís much better looking that I.
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  #22  
Old 08-04-2006, 06:14 PM
DANCESWITHGUNS DANCESWITHGUNS is online now
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Rob, You will probably have to fit a thumb safety to match the new parts. Should you buy a safety; make sure it will cover all of the hole on the frame or you will have a slight space when the safety is on, that might bother you (as far as looks). I thought about swaping out ignition parts for non mim but they haven't been a problem yet. I can't comment on Wilson parts because I haven't used them. Good luck.
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