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  #1  
Old 05-22-2012, 01:24 AM
awhein awhein is offline
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New to USPSA




Now that I have been shooting for a few months and have a membership to my local pistol range I have decided I want to start getting involved into USPSA. I plan to use my S&W 1911 E as well as my M&P9c. As I was thinking through the process I had a couple questions:

1. Are there any rules about trigger weights? I ask because I had a trigger job done on my 1911 and it's a very nice 3lbs trigger with basically no pre-travel or over-travel.

2. What do you do with empty mags as you are running a course? Do you just drop them as you go and then reclaim them after the run or do you need to put them somewhere on you?

Any feedback would be much appreciated.
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  #2  
Old 05-22-2012, 06:06 AM
richpetrone richpetrone is online now
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Uspsa

To my knowledge, any trigger weight is legal as long as it is deemed safe. Internal modifications to the sear, striker, etc. are allowed in Production Div.,
but any safety devices must be retained and must work.

Empty mags used during a course of fire may be dropped at any time, and any place as long as this complies with the course of fire description. You do not need to retain partially used mags.
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  #3  
Old 05-22-2012, 09:57 AM
Alland Alland is offline
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Make sure you carry enough mags. With single stack limited to eight rounds and production 10 rounds, I would not have less than four mags on the belt and 5 or 6 would be much better.
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  #4  
Old 05-22-2012, 03:21 PM
awhein awhein is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alland View Post
Make sure you carry enough mags. With single stack limited to eight rounds and production 10 rounds, I would not have less than four mags on the belt and 5 or 6 would be much better.
I have two 10 round mags now and just bought a Blackhawks dual mag pouch but I might need to get more it sounds like! When you say "production" limited to 10 rounds does that refer to a different division or are you referring to production guns vs something else?
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  #5  
Old 05-22-2012, 03:32 PM
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RickB RickB is online now
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Production is a competitive division of USPSA, limited to ten rounds capacity. When I shot Limited 10 division - also limited to 10 rounds capacity - I carried four mags on the belt. I can usually get away with four 8-rounders for Single Stack, but five or even six would all but ensure that you never run out.
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  #6  
Old 05-22-2012, 03:48 PM
mikeg1005 mikeg1005 is offline
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awhein,

My recommendation to you is to download the USPSA rulebook and read through it... It will give you a very good understanding of all the terminalogy that we use, as well as the safety rules and what is expected of competitors in this sport.

It will be a great thing to have knowledge of for your first match.

As to your specific questions, no trigger weight rules(they got turned down) and we just drop our mags during the reload and pick them up after the course of fire... in IDPA(different sport) there are requirements for retain mags... not in USPSA.

To be 'the most competitive' the two guns you own would be best shot in Single Stack division (for your 1911) and Production division (for your M&P)... The rulebook goes into detail on these two divisions/requirements.

For either production or single stack... I recommend a holster, and AT LEAST 4 mags on the belt(6 is ideal) but having one in the gun + 4 on the belt will cover your for most stages you come up against... other than that... find a match around you, email the match director mentioning you are a new shooter that wants to start, and they will help you out... they might even be able to find you equipment(holster, pouches, mags) in the event that you don't have them.

When you get to your first match...mention you are a new shooter, be safe and friendly and you will see a lot of people will come up and help you out/teach you the basics at your first match.

Mike.
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  #7  
Old 05-22-2012, 04:37 PM
TaxPhd TaxPhd is offline
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Your S&W 1911 E can't be shot in Production Division. You would shoot in Single Stack or Limited 10 with proper magazines.

I would recommend shooting that gun in single stack.
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  #8  
Old 05-22-2012, 05:09 PM
mbopp mbopp is offline
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In Single Stack your 1911 is limited to 8-round mags. If you use 10-rounders you're in Limited-10.
In Single Stack I use 4 mags on my belt, one in my back pocket for a first load, and a 7-rounder as my "Barney" top-off mag.
I don't try to catch my mags, usually(?) other shooters police your brass and mags for you while you follow the Range Officer and scoring person.
IIRR In IDPA you're required to stow your mags unless you're at slide lock.
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  #9  
Old 05-22-2012, 06:03 PM
Torogi Torogi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbopp View Post
In Single Stack your 1911 is limited to 8-round mags. If you use 10-rounders you're in Limited-10.
In Single Stack I use 4 mags on my belt, one in my back pocket for a first load, and a 7-rounder as my "Barney" top-off mag.
I don't try to catch my mags, usually(?) other shooters police your brass and mags for you while you follow the Range Officer and scoring person.
IIRR In IDPA you're required to stow your mags unless you're at slide lock.
More info; SS can also go for 10 (+1) only if being shot minor, and when using 10-rd mag it should still fit in the box. That being said, most of the time SS minor is 9mm since a 10-rd 45ACP mag will not fit in the box. Im new to 1911 so your gun is probably 45. So yeah, you can only go 8 (+1).

To OP, Q1 is well answered. Q2, while you are running around the course, just drop your magazine, dont worry about them. Don't even watch where you drop 'em -just don't step on it. After you run the course, most of the time it is retrieved by your squadmates and handed over to you.

Hope this helps.

Last edited by Torogi; 05-22-2012 at 06:07 PM.
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  #10  
Old 05-29-2012, 07:30 AM
WESHOOT2 WESHOOT2 is offline
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bring everything but yer ego

Just take yer stuff and go.
Let someone tell you what Division / Class blah balh blah.
Be safe and have fun.

You'll be glad you went.
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  #11  
Old 05-29-2012, 11:27 AM
eelpout eelpout is offline
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Have fun...

I agree with WESHOOT2, just go out there and shoot. You will find many people willing to answer your questions and give you suggestions on what to do. I myslef have just started. Our club had an orientation so I was able to ask questions and meet people so I could contact them later if I had more questions. There is so much equipment, divisions, rules and etc to think about that it may take the fun out ot it. I just went out wiht a ttitude to just shoot. I did really bad on the first cay and got a little better in the next. I have always had an improvement and it helps when I do have a lot of room for it. It is fun and most of the people are fun.

Jim
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  #12  
Old 05-29-2012, 09:52 PM
Joe40 Joe40 is offline
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Go to the club match and when you sign up besure to let them know you are a new shooter. At my two clubs we always have a seasoned shooter that is willing to help out a new shooter. Enjoy the sport cause it is a lot of fun...
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  #13  
Old 05-30-2012, 11:35 AM
awhein awhein is offline
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I appreciate everyones input and positive responses! I ordered a Blackhawks holster and some magazine holders and plan to hit up a completion as soon as I get them!
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  #14  
Old 05-30-2012, 01:54 PM
polizei1 polizei1 is offline
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I highly suggest you start your adventure here:

http://www.brianenos.com/forums/index.php?act=idx

Don't worry about good gear until a few matches in, shoot what you have for now. I shoot SS minor, PM me if you have any questions, I'd be more than willing to help.
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  #15  
Old 05-31-2012, 09:58 AM
JGus JGus is offline
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Once you get involved in USPSA you will be hooked. It's a LOT of fun.

I've been shooting shotguns most of my life, with the occasional rifle hunt, and thought I'd try USPSA matches at a local club a little over a year ago. While I have been shooting all my life, I was a complete novice to the action and skills involved in this type of competition. I'm still not scoring very well, but I'm definitely getting better. It just takes time. Don't expect to be great at it, regardless of how much shooting you've done in the past. It takes awhile to really become proficient.

I started with the very basics in terms of gun and equipment. The first time I ever shot in competition I used a standard belt with a nylon holster and nylon mag holster, using my Baby Desert Eagle 4.52" 9mm. And it worked just fine. But after talking with long term competitors and seeing what equipment they used and getting advice from them, I kept upgrading. And now I've got a really good set up. I still don't shoot worth a d*mn but I'm working on getting better and plan on being in this sport for a very long time, so the upgrade of equipment was well worth the investment.
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  #16  
Old 05-31-2012, 09:04 PM
BlueOvalBandit BlueOvalBandit is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JGus View Post
Once you get involved in USPSA you will be hooked. It's a LOT of fun.
Someone failed to mention that to me before I started, now I find my ammo bill has skyrocketed even though I reload. So who do I sue for not properly labeling this sport as highly addictive and damaging to my wallet?


Go out, tell them you're a new shooter, they'll squad you up with experienced shooters to show you the ropes. Also take it slow your first time, a lot of new people come out and try to be like the GM's rush and break the 180 or worse. Be conscious of you gun handling, speed will come and that is pretty much all from footwork and transitions.

And don't show up with your gun condition 1, don't laugh it's happened. Have fun most importantly.
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  #17  
Old 06-01-2012, 04:07 AM
WolfCreek WolfCreek is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueOvalBandit View Post
Someone failed to mention that to me before I started, now I find my ammo bill has skyrocketed even though I reload. So who do I sue for not properly labeling this sport as highly addictive and damaging to my wallet?
Then you get your 2 kids involved and your wife buys you bullet casting equipment.. Then of course you also do 3 Gun, which said kids now want to do, and your ammo usage goes insane...

Just go and have fun.

-Mark
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  #18  
Old 06-01-2012, 07:42 AM
richpetrone richpetrone is online now
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New to USPSA

Many clubs have different rules for range safety. If you can get to a website that explains the range location and safety rules, this will help you to be safe before you have to ask.

Many ranges are called a "cold range." All firearms must be unloaded, and may only be loaded at the direction of a safety officer. Some ranges have safe areas designated so you can check your empty weapon, perhaps do a few practice draws, and all of this is with an empty gun. Often times, it is forbidden to have ammo in a safe area or safe table. Other ranges may allow you to handle your weapon inside the trunk of your vehicle, so it is best to find out what rules may apply to the range you plan to attend. Also, it is often best to have the gun in a gun rug inside your shooting bag. Some people will have the gun holstered when they arrive, so make sure the gun is empty, with the hammer down....don't walk around with an empty gun holstered with the hammer cocked....people might mistake this for a loaded gun.

Be safe, ask questions, have fun!
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  #19  
Old 06-01-2012, 08:01 AM
richpetrone richpetrone is online now
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Your first USPSA match

Often times, during the shooter briefing, the match director may ask for a show of hands for all new shooters. They may then offer a new shooter briefing to advise on specific safety rules and procedures.

When it is your turn to shoot a stage, always pay attention to the Safety Officer or sometimes referred as the Range Officer (RO), who will be moving with you and holding a shot timer as you shoot the stage.

When you walk up to the shooting line or position, the Range Officer may ask you to face downrange. The range commands may go something like this:

1) Does the shooter understand the course of fire? If so, load and make ready. Once the gun is loaded, all safeties on, and the gun holstered, you must assume the start position, which varies with the stage design and course of fire (COF). Next, the range officer may say.....

2) Is the shooter ready? (you may nod yes or no) If you are ready, the RO may announce.......

3) The shooter is ready, standby....... There will usually be a short delay for the buzzer to start, which means you are now on the clock to engage all targets as described in the COF.

When you have completed the COF, the Range Officer will ask:

1) Is the shooter finished? You may nod yes....

2) The shooter is finished, unload and show me a clear weapon.....the shooter must drop the magazine and retain it, then pull back the slide to allow the RO to look inside the gun to make sure the chamber is empty....then say....

3) Slide down, hammer down, holster your weapon

4) The Range is Safe....

Once the range is declared safe, you may join the scorekeeper and review you hits for the stage, and also note your time.

The range commands may not be exactly as described, but I'm just giving you an idea that the Range Officer will give you clear directions on when to load and unload your gun, so it is best to follow their direction. Never take your empty weapon out of the holster until the RO gives you proper direction.

It is perfectly normal to be nervous for your first few matches if you have never done any action shooting. If this is the case, you may want to go slow and be safe for your first event. After a few matches, you comfort zone will expand, and you will be increasing your speed at every match. Learning to shoot with speed and accuracy is a life long pursuit....have fun and enjoy!

Last edited by richpetrone; 06-01-2012 at 08:08 AM.
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  #20  
Old 05-31-2012, 11:43 PM
awhein awhein is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueOvalBandit View Post

And don't show up with your gun condition 1, don't laugh it's happened. Have fun most importantly.
Lol, thanks for the tip. Had you not said anything that might happened.
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