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  #1  
Old 05-03-2012, 01:18 PM
GKC GKC is offline
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Advice on MKIV Series 70




I'd like some opinions, please. I have a new Colt MKIV Series 70 Government Model in stainless, and I am considering having a rounded trigger and beaver tail grip safety put on it. This is for personal preference only...I have small, fat hands, and tend to get hammer bite. I'm not planning on any other changes to the way it is set up now.

Now, this is a reproduction model, i.e. new production, not an old model...so, is that such a travesty? If I have this work done, I would send it to Colt to make sure it is done right, and not to have any warranty issues arise later. I might as well have them do some performance tuning while it is there.

I don't really plan to sell this gun, although we never know what life may bring...but I'm not overly concerned about resale value. If I had to, I could sell it for something, I know...so I guess I am asking, are these pistols likely to become highly collectible, and should I leave it alone? Or make the changes I want, and shoot it a lot.
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  #2  
Old 05-03-2012, 01:43 PM
taskotzke taskotzke is offline
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modify it to you're liking, and shoot it.
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  #3  
Old 05-03-2012, 01:57 PM
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dsk dsk is offline
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Just do like what I did- get two! I left one bone stock, except for replacement grips:



With the other one I had pistolsmith David Helton do some minor upgrades:



That way I don't feel guilty about having modified one.
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Try not to fall into the common trap of wanting to replace everything on your new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out, and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot it for at least 500 rounds, then decide what you don't like and want improved. Vintage 1911's should NEVER be refinished or modified because it ruins any value they had as a collectible firearm.
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Old 05-03-2012, 02:16 PM
Joel_H Joel_H is offline
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DSK, I think you like to post the pic of your modified stainless Series 70 just to see how many people ask about the ebony grips!
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  #5  
Old 05-03-2012, 04:30 PM
dakotaTex dakotaTex is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joel_H View Post
DSK, I think you like to post the pic of your modified stainless Series 70 just to see how many people ask about the ebony grips!
Dang, I fell right into his trap! Not to derail the thread (and I'm sure the info is probably here if I came up with the right search criteria), but can you please fill us in on the grips, or PM me a little info? I have a couple of 'black out' 1911s, and those grips would be great for my next version.

In reply to the original post: my feeling is that if you are buying a new gun to shoot then make it to your liking and don't worry about resale. You'll have a gun you really like and enjoy shooting, which to me is the whole point of owning a gun. Just make sure you have someone competent do the mods our you'll have a twinge of regret every time you look at it. (Gee, I wonder how I know that?)

On the other hand, if it were a pristine 'original' (made in the '70s) Series 70, then I think it would be a bad thing to make any permanent mods. I gun that has survived 30+ years in original form in great shape I think deserves to stay that way. But I would not have any qualms about shooting it.



dakotaTex

Last edited by dakotaTex; 05-03-2012 at 04:48 PM.
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  #6  
Old 05-03-2012, 05:10 PM
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The new Series 70 repros are not going to become collectible for quite some time. First, Colt has to stop making them. Second, they have to remain unavailable for a sufficient length of time for the demand to get where prices start to go up. I think you should do whatever you like to yours and not worry about future resale value. Like I said, if you want a collectible you can always buy another one later.

The black ebony grips on mine came from the Colt Custom Shop back around 1992 or so, and were used on only one or two limited edition models. I got them as replacements for a different set I had which cracked. I've never seen another set for sale, or else I'd have grabbed them already.
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Try not to fall into the common trap of wanting to replace everything on your new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out, and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot it for at least 500 rounds, then decide what you don't like and want improved. Vintage 1911's should NEVER be refinished or modified because it ruins any value they had as a collectible firearm.
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  #7  
Old 05-03-2012, 02:33 PM
GKC GKC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
Just do like what I did- get two! I left one bone stock, except for replacement grips:



With the other one I had pistolsmith David Helton do some minor upgrades:



That way I don't feel guilty about having modified one.
I would, if I was rich instead of so darn good looking...

I like the way you have yours set up. I hadn't thought about changing out the sights...which I now realize I need to do as well.
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  #8  
Old 05-03-2012, 04:29 PM
dakota1911 dakota1911 is online now
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I you save the original parts and can put it back the way it came then it will not reduce the value much of an original one that was fired the same amount. The problem is in the grip safety where they often do remove metal from the frame and you can't put it back the way it came and the frame is where the S/N is of course.
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  #9  
Old 05-03-2012, 06:49 PM
TEA TEA is offline
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^^^ I take it this advice does NOT apply to original Series '70s.
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  #10  
Old 05-03-2012, 07:58 PM
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I would apply the "don't mess with it" advice only to minty-clean original Series 70 models with the box and papers. On a pistol with some finish wear and without the box I'd say do whatever you like.
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Try not to fall into the common trap of wanting to replace everything on your new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out, and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot it for at least 500 rounds, then decide what you don't like and want improved. Vintage 1911's should NEVER be refinished or modified because it ruins any value they had as a collectible firearm.
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  #11  
Old 05-03-2012, 08:06 PM
Piexcel Piexcel is offline
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Has the original Colt Series 70 actually reached collectable status?
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  #12  
Old 05-05-2012, 01:58 AM
dakotaTex dakotaTex is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piexcel View Post
Has the original Colt Series 70 actually reached collectable status?
Anything is collectable. To me a NIB original Series 70 with the large roll mark with all the papers is collectible. It may not be to many others, but that just makes them more affordable. I can't possibly explain why that particular model calls to me, but it may be because I remember it so well from my teen years shooting. Kinda like a classic car. Heck, guys collect brand new models all the time.

But even a mint '70 without the box or papers is a shooter in my book. And I agree it makes a great base for a custom if it already has some wear. I just hate to mess with original guns that are 30 years old and still pristine.

Thanks DSK for the story on the grips. I bet there would be quite the bidding war if you were to ever part with them!


DakotaTex
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  #13  
Old 05-03-2012, 10:03 PM
TEA TEA is offline
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Originally Posted by dsk View Post
I would apply the "don't mess with it" advice only to minty-clean original Series 70 models with the box and papers. On a pistol with some finish wear and without the box I'd say do whatever you like.
Mine's minty, but no box or papers. I'm saving up for a Chip McCormick beavertail and the gunsmithing to install it correctly. The yellow dot of paint on the front sight with an overlay of fluorescent is working OK for me right now, so I think I'll keep the original sights as is - at least for now.
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  #14  
Old 05-03-2012, 08:58 PM
hodds hodds is offline
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I just sent a NIB 70 to heirloom for the full treatment. The 70 makes a great base gun for custom work.
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  #15  
Old 05-03-2012, 08:59 PM
x595 x595 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GKC View Post
I'd like some opinions, please. I have a new Colt MKIV Series 70 Government Model in stainless, and I am considering having a rounded trigger and beaver tail grip safety put on it. This is for personal preference only...I have small, fat hands, and tend to get hammer bite. I'm not planning on any other changes to the way it is set up now.
I would suggest , while you're sending it in , to get the Front Strap Checkered ... Good Luck !!!

Later,x595
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Old 05-03-2012, 09:03 PM
Redhat Redhat is offline
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I would just have another hammer installed. Something like this maybe?

http://shop.harrisoncustom.com/produ...ition-set.aspx

So you can avoid cutting the frame.
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  #17  
Old 05-03-2012, 09:53 PM
GKC GKC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by x595 View Post
I would suggest , while you're sending it in , to get the Front Strap Checkered ... Good Luck !!!

Later,x595
Thanks for the reminder!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Redhat View Post
I would just have another hammer installed. Something like this maybe?

http://shop.harrisoncustom.com/produ...ition-set.aspx

So you can avoid cutting the frame.
That is a good idea! I had always heard you had to change to a beaver tail (or the duck bill) grip safety. This looks like a good option. I don't mind the standard grip safety, I just don't like the standard hammer biting my plump little hand!
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  #18  
Old 05-05-2012, 12:46 PM
TEA TEA is offline
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Here is what I did to my front sight to make it easier to pick up in low light or against dark colored targets.


P.S. It was hard to line up the sight picture just right through the little view finder on my compact digital camera.

Last edited by TEA; 05-05-2012 at 12:48 PM. Reason: post script
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  #19  
Old 05-05-2012, 03:13 PM
dakota1911 dakota1911 is online now
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I have a 1974 I bought new that year. In 1975 I put new sights on it, throated, and ported it. I put a new trigger plus grips and a flat MSH on it. I have the trigger, MSH, and grips, but there is no going back. The box is long gone. I carried it for years and it has over 40K rounds through it. I would not sell this for any amount.

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  #20  
Old 05-05-2012, 04:19 PM
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No doubting your story, but I thought the small slide rollmark didn't come along until 1978?
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Try not to fall into the common trap of wanting to replace everything on your new 1911 just to make it "better". Know what you're changing out, and why. You may spend a lot of money fixing things that weren't broken to begin with. Shoot it for at least 500 rounds, then decide what you don't like and want improved. Vintage 1911's should NEVER be refinished or modified because it ruins any value they had as a collectible firearm.
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  #21  
Old 05-05-2012, 04:23 PM
TEA TEA is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsk View Post
No doubting your story, but I thought the small slide rollmark didn't come along until 1978?
Mine is a '78 and has the large roll mark.


P.S. Which do y'all like better, the original grips are the darker ones I have on now?




I like the darker ones. I think the reddish-brown compliments the blue better and I think it looks a bit more old school. I think the lighter grips stand out a little bit too much.

Last edited by TEA; 05-05-2012 at 04:43 PM.
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  #22  
Old 05-05-2012, 07:02 PM
dakotaTex dakotaTex is offline
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TEA,

Yeah, that's what I'm talking about! Very nice. The photos of the darker grips aren't as clear as the one with the original grips, but I do like the darker grips. I've got dark grips on nearly all my shooters, from the rubbery Kimber style to 10-8 Performance Signature grips. If it's a gun I shoot a lot, I generally end up with a Harrison black trigger as well.

I've never seen a knife used as a stand like that before. Looks cool and worrisome at the same time. What are the three proof marks in the upper right near the roll mark and on the frame?

Thanks for the pics,


dakotaTex

ps: cool 'license' btw
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  #23  
Old 05-06-2012, 12:25 AM
TEA TEA is offline
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Originally Posted by dakotaTex View Post
The photos of the darker grips aren't as clear as the one with the original grips, but I do like the darker grips.
Not sure why these newer pics didn't turn out as nice. Maybe because I was shooting indoors? I've tried adjusting the color a bit, since the colors looked a little on the blue side.





Quote:
Originally Posted by dakotaTex View Post
What are the three proof marks in the upper right near the roll mark and on the frame?
Those are German proof marks. I bought this from CIB, who bought it from someone who brought it back from Germany. Here's a close up.


I'm thinking of getting a beaver tail grip safety installed, but am on the fence because it would require modifying the frame to do it right.
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