1911Forum
Forum   Reviews   Rules   Legal   Site Supporters & Donations   Advertise


Go Back   1911Forum > Hardware & Accessories > Reloading Bench


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-23-2012, 07:55 PM
Teacher Teacher is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 246
lead exposure




Do any of you have health concerns about reloading with lead bullets during the reloading process or when firing the round? Does anyone have any real data or articles on this topic? I have always heard that lead is bad for the head.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-23-2012, 08:10 PM
GeneticJoe GeneticJoe is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,449
As long as you dont chew on it you'll be alright but seriously just wash ya hands good and if casting use ventalation
__________________
"I have a very strict gun control policy: if there's a gun around, I want to be in control of it."
- Clint Eastwood
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-23-2012, 08:18 PM
Cumminsman76 Cumminsman76 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: O'Fallon MO
Posts: 366
A friend is a range instructor for a PD and he gets blood taken for testing. He had to stay out of the range for a while. But he's around one alot.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-23-2012, 08:19 PM
RustyFN RustyFN is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: West Virginia
Posts: 1,368
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teacher View Post
Do any of you have health concerns about reloading with lead bullets during the reloading process or when firing the round? Does anyone have any real data or articles on this topic? I have always heard that lead is bad for the head.
No. I have been reloading almost six years and casting close to five. I have the lead levels checked every years when I have blood work done for other problems. Lead level have always been good. Don't eat drink or smoke while reloading or casting unless you wash your hands first.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-23-2012, 08:21 PM
Scotgolf2003 Scotgolf2003 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 158
It's not a worry you can't afford to shoot enough to get lead poisoning!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-23-2012, 08:34 PM
tarheelxd tarheelxd is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Eastern NC
Posts: 20
I had my lead level checked about two months ago when I saw my doctor for a sinus infection.It came back as "slightly elevated".I told my doc that I shoot indoors at least twice a month and that I loaded my own ammo.He told me to lay off the reloading and have it checked again in 3 months.I've reloaded once since the results came back;I wore blue nitrile exam gloves and used a cheap dust mask.I'm interested to see what the results will be next time.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-23-2012, 09:49 PM
Nick A Nick A is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 11,990
Reloading:
The lead on your hands is relatively harmless unless you smoke.
When it gets on the cigarette and becomes vaporized,
your lung tissues take it up like a sponge. Don't smoke.
Elemental lead (the pure metal) uptakes very slowly
through the skin, and very slowly through ingestion.
Elemental lead can stay in the body a lifetime with virtually no harm.
We all know of soldiers with bullets still in their bodies,
but they live full lives with no lead poisoning.
The big problem is not elemental lead, but lead compounds. Like primers.
Lead from spent primers can accumulate in your tumbler medium.
You really need to be aware of airborne tumbler dust.
Keep tumbler dust under control, or outside. And wash your hands.
That pretty much eliminates nearly all reloading hazards.
That's why guys can reload for a lifetime with no health problems.

Shooting indoors:
Products of combustion from the lead styphnate priming compound
absorb rapidly through the entire respiratory system.
That's the truly hazardous stuff. That's where full time range officers get it.
Limit your exposure by insisting on ventilation that pushes combustion
products down range, away from the line.
Find a properly ventilated indoor range with 100% air change.
Bullet lead: Very, very little lead from the bullet becomes airborne. Almost none.
Yes, I know. Many indoor ranges require plated or jacketed bullets
due to the health hazards. Well, the bullet really isn't the problem.
But it's hard to convince people of that. The primer is the big problem.
Either way, ventilation is the key.

Shooting outdoors:
Same hazards exist, but get diluted in the vast volume of Mother Nature.
Thanks, Mom. We can breathe easier outside.

Getting shot:
The biggest lead hazard is being on the wrong end of the trajectory.
You should do your best to avoid that.



Funny that tarheelxd's doctor recommended against reloading.
He should have recommended against indoor ranges.
He probably doesn't know much about either.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-23-2012, 10:26 PM
snow's Avatar
snow snow is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: The Sooner State
Posts: 2,210
Excellent post Nick!!!! I agree 100 %.


I cannot add much to it, but it is worth reiterating, make sure you are shooting in a well ventilated area. I did some testing on used media, the results are on this thread; http://forums.1911forum.com/showthread.php?t=332004
__________________
Nancy Astor: Sir, if you were my husband, I would poison your tea.

Winston Churchill: Madam, If I were your husband, I would drink it.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 08-28-2012, 06:57 AM
smallie9 smallie9 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick A View Post
Reloading:
The lead on your hands is relatively harmless unless you smoke.
When it gets on the cigarette and becomes vaporized,
your lung tissues take it up like a sponge. Don't smoke.
Elemental lead (the pure metal) uptakes very slowly
through the skin, and very slowly through ingestion.
Elemental lead can stay in the body a lifetime with virtually no harm.
We all know of soldiers with bullets still in their bodies,
but they live full lives with no lead poisoning.
The big problem is not elemental lead, but lead compounds. Like primers.
Lead from spent primers can accumulate in your tumbler medium.
You really need to be aware of airborne tumbler dust.
Keep tumbler dust under control, or outside. And wash your hands.
That pretty much eliminates nearly all reloading hazards.
That's why guys can reload for a lifetime with no health problems.

Shooting indoors:
Products of combustion from the lead styphnate priming compound
absorb rapidly through the entire respiratory system.
That's the truly hazardous stuff. That's where full time range officers get it.
Limit your exposure by insisting on ventilation that pushes combustion
products down range, away from the line.
Find a properly ventilated indoor range with 100% air change.
Bullet lead: Very, very little lead from the bullet becomes airborne. Almost none.
Yes, I know. Many indoor ranges require plated or jacketed bullets
due to the health hazards. Well, the bullet really isn't the problem.
But it's hard to convince people of that. The primer is the big problem.
Either way, ventilation is the key.

Shooting outdoors:
Same hazards exist, but get diluted in the vast volume of Mother Nature.
Thanks, Mom. We can breathe easier outside.

Getting shot:
The biggest lead hazard is being on the wrong end of the trajectory.
You should do your best to avoid that.



Funny that tarheelxd's doctor recommended against reloading.
He should have recommended against indoor ranges.
He probably doesn't know much about either.
BRAVO!! Very well done and stated, sound information. By the way, I have some "sparse" lead floating in my body...........I think I'm OK
__________________
Old Jarhead

1918 USGI Colt 1911 / 1944 USGI Remington 1911A1
Colt Govt Model 80 / Les Baer Monolith HW
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-13-2013, 08:11 PM
MMH MMH is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 33
Thanks Nick!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick A View Post
Reloading:
The lead on your hands is relatively harmless unless you smoke.
When it gets on the cigarette and becomes vaporized,
your lung tissues take it up like a sponge. Don't smoke.
Elemental lead (the pure metal) uptakes very slowly
through the skin, and very slowly through ingestion.
Elemental lead can stay in the body a lifetime with virtually no harm.
We all know of soldiers with bullets still in their bodies,
but they live full lives with no lead poisoning.
The big problem is not elemental lead, but lead compounds. Like primers.
Lead from spent primers can accumulate in your tumbler medium.
You really need to be aware of airborne tumbler dust.
Keep tumbler dust under control, or outside. And wash your hands.
That pretty much eliminates nearly all reloading hazards.
That's why guys can reload for a lifetime with no health problems.

Shooting indoors:
Products of combustion from the lead styphnate priming compound
absorb rapidly through the entire respiratory system.
That's the truly hazardous stuff. That's where full time range officers get it.
Limit your exposure by insisting on ventilation that pushes combustion
products down range, away from the line.
Find a properly ventilated indoor range with 100% air change.
Bullet lead: Very, very little lead from the bullet becomes airborne. Almost none.
Yes, I know. Many indoor ranges require plated or jacketed bullets
due to the health hazards. Well, the bullet really isn't the problem.
But it's hard to convince people of that. The primer is the big problem.
Either way, ventilation is the key.

Shooting outdoors:
Same hazards exist, but get diluted in the vast volume of Mother Nature.
Thanks, Mom. We can breathe easier outside.

Getting shot:
The biggest lead hazard is being on the wrong end of the trajectory.
You should do your best to avoid that.



Funny that tarheelxd's doctor recommended against reloading.
He should have recommended against indoor ranges.
He probably doesn't know much about either.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 01-24-2012, 07:50 AM
Teacher Teacher is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 246
Nick A and Sno, thanks for the informed answers. If anyone is reading this thread, don't skip the link posted by Sno. Tarheel XD, keep me posted on the followup lead test. I've got a little tar on my heels in Concord NC myself.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 01-24-2012, 08:12 AM
Emerson Emerson is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: KCMO
Posts: 1,838
Nick nailed it spot on.
__________________
Owning a handgun doesn't make you armed any more than owning a guitar makes you a musician - Col Jeff Cooper
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 01-24-2012, 08:38 AM
mikeg1005 mikeg1005 is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Illinois
Posts: 6,481
Like I tell everyone...

Don't eat the boolits.

Also consider making sure that your calcium intake is sufficiant... your body recognizes lead as calcium, and stores it in its bones... this is especially important to growing children(hense why they always freak out about kids gnawing on lead covered stuff.

Mike.

Last edited by mikeg1005; 01-24-2012 at 08:40 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 01-24-2012, 09:16 AM
dickttx dickttx is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Fort Worth
Age: 77
Posts: 1,133
Very interesting and informative thread. I am not a sky is falling type but do try to take normal precautions. I don't check my gas tank with a match either.
Snow, were you cleaning the brass (in your other thread) with the primers removed or with them still in? Would it make a difference?
__________________
Education teaches you the rules; experience teaches you the exceptions. (Plagiarized from Claude Clay)
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 01-24-2012, 09:46 AM
mikeg1005 mikeg1005 is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Illinois
Posts: 6,481
Quote:
Originally Posted by dickttx View Post
Very interesting and informative thread. I am not a sky is falling type but do try to take normal precautions. I don't check my gas tank with a match either.
Snow, were you cleaning the brass (in your other thread) with the primers removed or with them still in? Would it make a difference?
Inhaling ANY dust, whether its contaminated with lead or not is not healthy... obviously with lead is worse for you, but one should always take precautions not to inhale it/get it everywhere.

Best solution I have found, is change out your media... new media almost NEVER produces airborne dust, where as old stuff is BAD... clean media+cleaning in an open/vented area is the best solution.

MIke.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 01-24-2012, 11:08 AM
BillD BillD is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Independence, IN
Age: 59
Posts: 21,935
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeg1005 View Post
Inhaling ANY dust, whether its contaminated with lead or not is not healthy... obviously with lead is worse for you, but one should always take precautions not to inhale it/get it everywhere.

Best solution I have found, is change out your media... new media almost NEVER produces airborne dust, where as old stuff is BAD... clean media+cleaning in an open/vented area is the best solution.

MIke.

When it gets dirty, I take my corncob (which has a LOT of dust when new) outside and pour it back and forth between two buckets and let the breeze carry away the dust.

As with PortaPotties, stand upwind.

I've started using a dust mask when emptying the tumbler.
__________________
You can make excuses or you can make ready.
Life is too short to buy cheap guns.
USPSA TY41889
NRA Life Member
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 01-24-2012, 07:21 PM
snow's Avatar
snow snow is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: The Sooner State
Posts: 2,210
Quote:
Originally Posted by dickttx View Post
Very interesting and informative thread. I am not a sky is falling type but do try to take normal precautions. I don't check my gas tank with a match either.
Snow, were you cleaning the brass (in your other thread) with the primers removed or with them still in? Would it make a difference?

The primers were still in the case. I think it reasonable to assume, it would make a difference if the cases were de-capped first, as the primers do contain residual lead compounds. However, I did not make that distinction in the test.


My test was a total number only, and did not distinguish source. I may do some more testing in the future out of curiosity. Since you read the thread, then you know that it is of little/no concern to most of the members I post actual numbers, and they give me the "sky is falling" routine


It is a simple problem to avoid, tumble and (at the very least, sift) outdoors, particularly with an open top tumbler, to avoid spreading the dusts throughout the home via the Heat/AC system.
__________________
Nancy Astor: Sir, if you were my husband, I would poison your tea.

Winston Churchill: Madam, If I were your husband, I would drink it.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 01-24-2012, 08:41 PM
Griz44 Griz44 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: REPUBLIC OF TEXAS, DISTRICT OF MANOR
Posts: 1,024
Quote:
He told me to lay off the reloading and have it checked again in 3 months.
Your Doc had it bass ackwards. he should have told get out of the indoor range instead. The reloading has pretty close to zero risk. Indoor shooting is pretty much the only thing I have heard of in 40 years of shooting that anyone ever had any lead issues with. NEVER from reloading. To keep my wife happy (you know that routine) I get my lead checked with my physical every year. No issues - ever. shoot (a lot) and cast 30k rounds a year. Lead is not an issue unless you shoot indoors.
__________________
Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth.
George Washington
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 01-24-2012, 09:53 AM
CherokeeT CherokeeT is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Medina, Ohio
Posts: 555
Been casting and reloading indoors for 50+ years and have had my blood levels checked with normal results. Until last couple of years, 100% outdoor shooting. Winters now I am shooting indoors, the range has good circulation that draws the air away from the line. Just be careful about breathing the primer dust and wash your hands.
__________________
NRA Endowment, TSRA Life, SASS, U S Army
God Bless America !!
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 01-24-2012, 11:00 AM
gnystrom gnystrom is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 216
I am a part time RSO at a local indoor range. Yesterday I was given a 30 page notebook on lead hazards and how to avoid them. All broken down, Nick hit it on the head. Wash face, forearms, and hands before eating or drinking. Change clothes when you get home. We have a state of the art range and it passed OSHA testing but we constantly are chasing our tail to keep it that way. Fans and new filters really make a difference. Dust is the enemy.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 01-24-2012, 11:13 AM
drinkypoo drinkypoo is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Kelseyville, CA, USA
Posts: 143
Just picked up a respirator good for dust as well as metal vapors at harbor freight for fifteen bucks. Typical price for such a disposable is twenty. They have nitrile gloves on sale just now too, $6.99/50. Some pretty great fold-up ears for $10 too.

Typical cost for respirator with replaceable filters is $30 with filters for $18 or $20 for disposable and you get a new mask and straps every time.
__________________
You are what you do when it counts.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 01-25-2012, 12:31 AM
hattrick hattrick is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 203
I took a old box fan and taped on a furnace filter. Turn the fan on and sift right in front of the fan. All the nasty stuff gets sucked into the filter.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 01-25-2012, 06:12 PM
bsmotril bsmotril is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Austin, TX
Age: 56
Posts: 241
Quote:
Originally Posted by hattrick View Post
I took a old box fan and taped on a furnace filter. Turn the fan on and sift right in front of the fan. All the nasty stuff gets sucked into the filter.
A furnace filter is not going to catch vapor.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 01-25-2012, 06:14 PM
Nick A Nick A is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 11,990
I think Hattrick means filtering the airborne solids (dust) from sifting his tumbler medium.

The big question is micron size. Furnace filters come in different grades.
One looks up the micron filtration of that particular filter,
then determines the size of dust being captured.
Match the two together.
Filter too fine, impedes air flow.
Filter too large, won't trap particles.

Last edited by Nick A; 01-25-2012 at 06:17 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 01-25-2012, 06:28 PM
bjeffv bjeffv is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1,256
here is a little background on lead. I can e-mail a full powerpoint of a presentation on some of the lesser known effects of lead. I conduct research on heavy metals as carcinogens, and am a member of the society of toxicology.

Known link in renal carcinoma.
Studies from the 1970s to early 1990s demonstrated that Pb2+ impaired cognitive function at increasingly lower doses.
CDC then lowered the definition of intoxication from 25 g/dL to 10 g/dL.
Even more recent studies show that lower exposure amounts lead to cognitive deficits


There is a strong association between lead exposure all kinds of behavioral problems.
ADHD
Anti-social behavior
Lower test scores
Violent behavior as adults
Reduced brain volume as adults
Exposure is irreversible.
Chelation therapy works for acute doses, but does not improve cognitive function.

I load lead bullets myself, and shoot indoors. The range has a ventilation system that costs 6k a month for filters. Even exposure via skin will accumulate. I wear gloves at all times well handling bullets, and loading clips.

Heavy metals including cadmium, lead, and arsenic all accumulate in your kidneys, there it has a half life of 20-25 years. Blood tests show current levels of metal in your blood low level exposure accumulates in other organs. So a decreased blood level just means your current exposure is lower, but the metal is still "somewhere" in your body.

Although a person may live with a bullet lodge in their body for a long time, I completely disagree that it has no effect. Cognitive tests for before and after would be needed to prove that either way.

Last edited by bjeffv; 01-25-2012 at 07:22 PM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:39 AM.


NOTICE TO USERS OF THIS SITE: By continuing to use this site, you certify that you have read and agree to abide by the Legal Terms of Use. All information, data, text or other materials ("Content") posted to this site by any users are the sole responsibility of those users. 1911Forum does not guarantee the accuracy, integrity, or quality of such Content.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2011 1911Forum.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved